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A Premier League assistant referee flagging for offside.

Learning Vocabulary: Phrases with go

Learning Vocabulary: Phrases with go

In this week's Premier Skills English Podcast, Jack and Rich try to describe the offside rule and roleplay five short conversations where they use phrases with go. They look at five different ways of using go and how you can use these phrases in your everyday English. Your task is to use some difficult phrases with go in context. As always, we also have a new football phrase for you to guess. Enjoy!

Transcript

If you find the podcast difficult to understand, you can read the transcript and listen at the same time.
Read and listen at the same time.

Introduction:

Jack: Alright, Rich? How’s it going?

Rich: Not bad. Actually, I’m stuck on something. I’m working on an article about the rules of football and I’m trying to write the offside rule in an easy way so everybody can understand.

Jack: What have you got so far?

Rich: The law states that a player is in an offside position if any of their body except the hands and arms is in the opponent's' half of the pitch and closer to the opponents' goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent. 

Jack: That sounds a bit difficult. Not sure if everybody is going to understand that. Let’s think of something a bit easier.

Rich: Go on then. Go for it!

Jack: Here we go then … what about … when a player passes the ball forwards to a teammate who is in the attacking half of the pitch, there should be two players from the defending team in front of the player receiving the ball?

Jack: There you go! Easy!

Rich: I’m not sure if that’s exactly right or if it is any easier for learners to understand. Can you go over that again?

Jack: Let’s go for a drink and we can go through it one more time.

Rich: Good idea. Let’s go!

Welcome - Go

Rich: Hello my name’s Rich

Jack: and I’m Jack

Rich: and welcome to this week’s Premier Skills English podcast

Jack: Where we talk about football and help you with your English.

Jack: What’s happening this week, Rich?

Rich: In this week’s podcast, we’re looking at vocabulary. We’re going to look at some common phrases, collocations and phrasal verbs with the word ‘go’.

Jack: Did you notice that we used lots of different phrases with ‘go’ in the opening conversation? We’re going to look at some of these again later on.

Rich: And don’t forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have a new football phrase for you to try to guess.

Topic Focus

Jack: In this section, we’re going to do five short roleplays and your challenge is to listen for the word ‘go’ and think about how it is being used.

Rich: Ready for roleplay one?

Jack: Go for it!

Rich: Roleplay one.

Jack: Are you going home after work?

Rich: No, I’m going to the match.

Jack: You’re going to the stadium? I didn’t know you had tickets. I thought you’d be going to the pub to watch it.

Rich: No, but I might go on the way though.

Jack: One of the most common ways to use go is with places and events. In this example we used go home, go to the match, go to the stadium and go to the pub.

Rich: There is a difference between going to school and going to the school and going to hospital and going to the hospital, isn’t there?

Jack: Yes, with some phrases you can use the article and it changes the meaning. Without the it means you’re going to the place for its intended purpose. For example, I’m going to hospital because I’m sick or I’m going to school to study. If you say I’m going to the hospital or I’m going to the school, it means you are visiting the building and it could be for a different reason.

Rich: But we only use these phrases for specific places.

Jack: Yes, hospital, school, church, university and maybe a few more.

Rich: Listen to our podcast about articles if you want to learn more about speaking about general and specific nouns.

Jack: There is a link on the side of the page.

Rich: Roleplay two.

Jack: Did you do anything at the weekend?

Rich: Not really. I went shopping for a few bits and bobs … oh and I went swimming on Sunday. I always go swimming on Sunday mornings. What about you?

Jack: I had a brilliant weekend. We went to the beach and my boys went surfing for the first time.

Rich: And you?

Jack: I went for an ice-cream.

Rich: Another common way to use go is go + ing. In the conversation you heard go shopping, go swimming and go surfing.

Jack: It’s really common to use go + ing when we are talking about leisure activities - things you do in your free time.

Rich: We use go when we can speak about an activity in the gerund form like swimming and shopping.

Jack: Some other common phrases are things like go camping, go jogging, go fishing and go mountain climbing.

Rich: Roleplay three.

Jack: What’s that?

Rich: What’s what?

Jack: That there in your hair.

Rich: I don’t know what you’re talking about.

Jack: Grey hair. You’re going grey!

Rich: Alright, it happens to all of us you know, unless you go bald!

Jack: Yeah, yeah! 

Rich: We can use go to mean become, in the conversation you heard going grey and go bald. This means that my hair is becoming grey and Jack is bald.

Jack: I’ve still got some hair!

Rich: Alright, you are going bald!

Jack: Mmm .. there are other phrases like this such as go mad, go crazy and go wrong or go off.

Rich: Go off?

Jack: Yes, that’s a difficult one. It’s a bit like a phrasal verb, really. We can it to describe food that has gone or become bad because it is old. That food’s gone off! Yuk! I’m not sure if it really is a phrasal verb because off is an adjective that means bad for food - usually eggs and milk. You can say - this milk is off.

Rich: But go off is a phrasal verb as well. We use it to mean explode for bombs and fireworks. 

Jack: And for alarm clocks. What time did your alarm go off this morning?

Rich: Roleplay four.

Jack: Do you want to go for a drink?

Rich: No, not tonight, Jack. I’ve really got to go for a run tonight. I haven’t done any exercise in ages.

Jack: Never mind. I should probably go for a jog or something instead, perhaps I’ll go for a walk.

Rich: What about going for a meal at the weekend? We could all go?

Jack: Sounds good.

Rich: The phrase go for a is a useful one. It means to go somewhere to do something.

Jack: In the example, Rich said he had to go for a run.

Rich: Go for a drink, go for a coffee or go for a meal are phrases that are often used in invitations.

Jack: Roleplay five.

Rich: The price of butter has gone up again.

Jack: Prices never go down, do they?

Rich: Look over there! The butter shop - it says everything must go!

Jack: There you go!

Rich: That was a stupid conversation!

Jack: I know … but the word go is very common in phrasal verbs and other phrases. For example, go up and go down are phrasal verbs that mean increase and decrease and the phrase everything must go is a phrase you see at shops when they want to sell everything.

Rich: We’ve got some more difficult phrases and phrasal verbs for you to learn on the lesson page below this podcast.

Jack: Before we go … I thought we could talk about a couple more phrases with go because there are so many to learn.

Rich: OK, one of my favourites is when you ask How does that song go?

Jack: Ah, yes. Here go means expressed or played - what’s the tune to a song … how does it go? 

Rich: Other phrases I like are How’s it going and What’s going on? Which we use at the start of conversations instead of how are you? and what’s happening? They’re informal greetings.

Jack: What about football phrases?

Rich: I like go for it. A team has to go for it if they want to win. If both teams go for it, it usually means a really attacking game with lots of goals. Any others?

Jack: There is here we go, of course.

Rich: Here we go?

Jack: You know fans at football stadiums shout it: here we go, here we go, here we go.

Rich: Of course. Why do we sing that?

Jack: Good question!

Football phrase

Rich: Have you got a football phrase for us this week? 

Jack: Yes, I have, but first, last week’s football phrase. Last week’s phrase was miss out.  It means to not do something or not to take part in something that is usually enjoyable. Some players will miss out on the World Cup because of injury and some will miss out because they’re not selected.

Rich: Well done to Lakerwang from China, Sabanoleg and Liubomyr from Ukraine, Ahmed Adam from Sudan, Milos from Serbia,  from Indonesia and Kwesimanifest from Ghana. You all got the right answer! What’s this week’s football phrase?

Jack: This week’s football phrase is to ** ****. It’s a phrasal verb with the word we’ve been looking at in this week’s podcast so shouldn’t be too difficult! It means to be relegated. Stoke City, West Brom and Swansea have **** **** this season.

Rich: Easy! Right, that’s all we have time for this week! Don’t forget to write your answers to our questions and make a guess at our football phrase in the comments below.

Jack: If you have enjoyed this podcast or found it useful, leave us a rating or review and that will help other people find us. 

Rich: Bye for now and enjoy your football!

Vocabulary

How much did you understand?

In the podcast, Rich and Jack used some words and phrases that might be new for you. Do you know the words in bold?

I went shopping for a few bits and bobs.

It happens to all of us you know, unless you go bald.

There were a few more tricky words in the podcast. Do you know what they all mean? Try the activity below, then, listen to the podcast again to hear how we used the words.

Activity 1

Activity 1: In this activity, try to match the words and phrases to their definitions. All of the words were in this week's podcast.
Can you match the words to their definitions?

Jack's children WENT SURFING last weekend while he WENT FOR AN ice-cream!

Language

Phrases with go

In this week's podcast, Jack and Rich spoke about the word go. Did you know that it had lots of different meanings? They discussed five common ways to use go:

Go (to) + a place or event

We can use phrases such as go to hospital, go to school and go home when we talk about going to a place for its intended purpose. With other phrases and events such as go to the match, go to the concert, go to the cafe we are talking about a specific event or building.  Take a look at these examples from the podcast:

Are you going home after work?

No, I'm going to the match.

Go + -ing

It is common to use go + -ing when we are talking about leisure activities such as shopping, camping or fishing. The activity uses the gerund form and is a noun, not a verb. Take a look at these examples from the podcast:

I went swimming on Sunday.

My boys went surfing for the first time.

Go = become

Go can sometimes mean become which means to change from one state to another. These expressions are often connected to the body. Take a look at these examples from the podcast:

You're going grey.

It happens to us all, unless you go bald!

Go for a + noun

This is a nice informal structure that is useful to learn. It's a common phrase to use for informal invitations and can also be used to describe something that you are going to do. Take a look at these examples from the podcast:

What about going for a meal this weekend?

I should probably go for a run or something.

Phrasal Verbs with go

Go is often found in phrasal verbs such as go away, go down and go up. The best way to learn phrasal verbs is in context. Here are some examples from the podcast:

The price of butter has gone up again.

Prices never go down, do they?

In the activity below, take a look at some sentences that use phrases with go and try to write the missing words.

Activity 2

Activity 2: In this activity, write the correct word to complete each sentence. All the phrases were in this week's podcast.
Can you type the right word?

Prices often GO UP but they GO DOWN sometimes, too.

Task

10 phrases with 'go'

Go is a very common word and there are hundreds of collocations and phrases that use it. We've looked at lots of phrases with go in this podcast. Here are ten more that we used in this podcast. Your task is to listen again (or use the transcript to help you) to find the phrases and use some of them in an example sentence or two in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

  1. How's it going?
  2. Go bald.  
  3. There you go.
  4. Go for it!
  5. Go up.
  6. Yuck! That's gone off!
  7. Go through.
  8. Let's go!
  9. Here we go.
  10. How does it go again?

Do you know all of these phrases? When might you use or hear these phrases?

Quiz

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Comment

What do you think?

In this week’s podcast, Jack and Rich had problems describing the offside rule and they spoke about phrases with go.

  • What's the simplest way to describe the offside rule?
  • How often do you go out at the weekends? Do you often go for a drink/meal with friends? Do you like going shopping/camping/sightseeing?
  • You go to the match, a team goes up and it's great when two teams go for it. Can you think of any other football phrases with 'go'?

Look at the task above and try to use two or three of the phrases with go. Write your answers below. 

Remember to write your guess at this week's football phrase, too!

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Comments

Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
19/05/2018
SD
2469
points

I wish there would be a future podcast about the language of sympathy and condolences. Common phrases to say when someone's terribly ill, got stolen, received terrible news and also when a very close person dies.


Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
19/05/2018 16:25
Sudan
Liverpool
2469

I wish there would be a future podcast about the language of sympathy and condolences. Common phrases to say when someone's terribly ill, got stolen, received terrible news and also when a very close person dies.

Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
19/05/2018
SD
2469
points

Hi fellow brothers on the Premier Skills English community. I'm wishing you a happy Ramadan and if I did something wrong to someone or insulted him, please, forgive me. Now remember, Don't miss out on Tarawih.


Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
19/05/2018 16:15
Sudan
Liverpool
2469

Hi fellow brothers on the Premier Skills English community. I'm wishing you a happy Ramadan and if I did something wrong to someone or insulted him, please, forgive me. Now remember, Don't miss out on Tarawih.

Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
19/05/2018
SD
2469
points

Correct me.

★A player falls under the offside trap when he receives a forward pass from a teammate and the receiver is some distance ahead from the whole opposition apart from the keeper. Seems like I've muddied the waters by this definition!

★I often go for a drink with friends on weekends and I do like (to go or going sightseeing) with friends too. Can I use 2 (ing) forms in one sentence? Please, help!

★Football phrases with go:
▶To go down to the wire; the relegation scrap went down to the wire. I wish WBA had managed a final day scape.
▶Going into; Liverpool are going into this CL final with the highest number of goals scored in a single CL campaign.
▶To go head-to-head; can't wait till May 26th when two of the most successful European clubs go head-to-head.
▶To go unbeaten; Barca went unbeaten for 36 games in the league this season until they surprisingly lost to Levante last week.

★Football phrase; easy, to '** ****'.


Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
19/05/2018 16:04
Sudan
Liverpool
2469

Correct me.

★A player falls under the offside trap when he receives a forward pass from a teammate and the receiver is some distance ahead from the whole opposition apart from the keeper. Seems like I've muddied the waters by this definition!

★I often go for a drink with friends on weekends and I do like (to go or going sightseeing) with friends too. Can I use 2 (ing) forms in one sentence? Please, help!

★Football phrases with go:
▶To go down to the wire; the relegation scrap went down to the wire. I wish WBA had managed a final day scape.
▶Going into; Liverpool are going into this CL final with the highest number of goals scored in a single CL campaign.
▶To go head-to-head; can't wait till May 26th when two of the most successful European clubs go head-to-head.
▶To go unbeaten; Barca went unbeaten for 36 games in the league this season until they surprisingly lost to Levante last week.

★Football phrase; easy, to '** ****'.

lakerwang
19/05/2018
CN
219
points

A player is in an offside position if any of their body except the hands and arms is in the opponent's' half of the pitch and closer to the opponents' goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent. When a player is only in an offside position, the referee won't blow the whistle untill his teammate attempts to pass the ball to him. Besides, a player in an offside position can legally get a throw-in or a corner kick which I think is because no one is closer to the goal line than the ball when a corner kick is taken.
I often go out for a cycling at the weekends.
"The coach had a go at the goalkeeper after he had had a go at going past the opponent's forward."
This week's phrase is "** ****".


lakerwang
19/05/2018 13:14
China
Chelsea
219

A player is in an offside position if any of their body except the hands and arms is in the opponent's' half of the pitch and closer to the opponents' goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent. When a player is only in an offside position, the referee won't blow the whistle untill his teammate attempts to pass the ball to him. Besides, a player in an offside position can legally get a throw-in or a corner kick which I think is because no one is closer to the goal line than the ball when a corner kick is taken.
I often go out for a cycling at the weekends.
"The coach had a go at the goalkeeper after he had had a go at going past the opponent's forward."
This week's phrase is "** ****".

Violinka
18/05/2018
UA
1430
points

I think the phrase is "** ****". Could you answer my question please! How is right? "I'm going for a work" or "I'm going to the work"


Violinka
18/05/2018 13:58
Ukraine
Chelsea
1430

I think the phrase is "** ****". Could you answer my question please! How is right? "I'm going for a work" or "I'm going to the work"

admin's picture
admin
18/05/2018
GB
212
points

Hi Violinka

If you are going to do your job, you could say 'I'm going to work'. Work is one of those places that doesn't need an article. However, if you're talking about the place that you work, you would need to use 'the', e.g. I'm going to the office.

I hope that answers your question. If it's not clear, let me know and I'll try to explain it better.

Thanks

Jack - The Premier Skills English Team


admin's picture
admin
18/05/2018 14:47
United Kingdom
Arsenal
212

Hi Violinka

If you are going to do your job, you could say 'I'm going to work'. Work is one of those places that doesn't need an article. However, if you're talking about the place that you work, you would need to use 'the', e.g. I'm going to the office.

I hope that answers your question. If it's not clear, let me know and I'll try to explain it better.

Thanks

Jack - The Premier Skills English Team

Violinka
21/05/2018
UA
1430
points

Thanks, it's clear now.


Violinka
21/05/2018 12:44
Ukraine
Chelsea
1430

Thanks, it's clear now.

btriton
18/05/2018
PE
21
points

When some player assist to other one, who is forwards to the opponents.
This weekend I will spend time with my family I will go for a meal to any restaurant, probably seafood.
the football phrase I guess is "set aside"


btriton
18/05/2018 10:41
Peru
Manchester United
21

When some player assist to other one, who is forwards to the opponents.
This weekend I will spend time with my family I will go for a meal to any restaurant, probably seafood.
the football phrase I guess is "set aside"

admin's picture
admin
18/05/2018
GB
212
points

That's a good attempt at a definition. It's really hard to explain clearly. 

Sorry, but that's not the phrase this week. Have another go?


admin's picture
admin
18/05/2018 11:09
United Kingdom
Arsenal
212

That's a good attempt at a definition. It's really hard to explain clearly. 

Sorry, but that's not the phrase this week. Have another go?

kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018
GH
4395
points

When Eric Bailey is fully fit he is always willing to go in for a tackle.


kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018 15:18
Ghana
Manchester United
4395

When Eric Bailey is fully fit he is always willing to go in for a tackle.

kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018
GH
4395
points

I go out on sightseeing most weekends on my bike.


kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018 15:02
Ghana
Manchester United
4395

I go out on sightseeing most weekends on my bike.

kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018
GH
4395
points

An offside occurs as an when a ball is being played from one player to a colleague when the the recepient of the ball is beyond the opponents defense men especially the last man to the goal keeper.


kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018 15:00
Ghana
Manchester United
4395

An offside occurs as an when a ball is being played from one player to a colleague when the the recepient of the ball is beyond the opponents defense men especially the last man to the goal keeper.

sabanoleg
17/05/2018
UA
1903
points

I think this week's phrase is"** ****"


sabanoleg
17/05/2018 14:36
Ukraine
Arsenal
1903

I think this week's phrase is"** ****"

elghoul's picture
elghoul
17/05/2018
DZ
2171
points

When you pass the ball forward to a teammate who is in the attacking part of the field there must be two opponents players between your teammate and the goal line.

I am used to go out on week ends with my family. I often took them by car to the sea side and while they  went for a swim I went simply for a walk on the beach.

The manager went off his mind when the referee showed his red card against the keeper.

football phrase, broken through the trap.


elghoul's picture
elghoul
17/05/2018 13:36
Algeria
Arsenal
2171

When you pass the ball forward to a teammate who is in the attacking part of the field there must be two opponents players between your teammate and the goal line.

I am used to go out on week ends with my family. I often took them by car to the sea side and while they  went for a swim I went simply for a walk on the beach.

The manager went off his mind when the referee showed his red card against the keeper.

football phrase, broken through the trap.

Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
17/05/2018
UA
2333
points

I think that the phrase is to ‘** ****’.


Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
17/05/2018 12:45
Ukraine
Watford
2333

I think that the phrase is to ‘** ****’.

kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018
GH
4395
points

This week's phrase is ** ****


kwesimanifest's picture
kwesimanifest
17/05/2018 11:32
Ghana
Manchester United
4395

This week's phrase is ** ****

milos
17/05/2018
RS
832
points

A player is in an offside position if: he or she is nearer to his opponents' goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent.Or we can say player who is on attack must be in line behind two defender player when the ball is pass to him.
I usually don't go out at the weekends,but I love going for a walk,and also I love going sightseeing.
That was a hard faul.Next time he must go easy or he wil be sent off.
Football phrase for this week is to ** ****.


milos
17/05/2018 07:23
Serbia
Manchester United
832

A player is in an offside position if: he or she is nearer to his opponents' goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent.Or we can say player who is on attack must be in line behind two defender player when the ball is pass to him.
I usually don't go out at the weekends,but I love going for a walk,and also I love going sightseeing.
That was a hard faul.Next time he must go easy or he wil be sent off.
Football phrase for this week is to ** ****.

Rich's picture
Rich
17/05/2018
ES
248
points

Well done, Milos. You're the first to get the football phrase this week. Good work on the different types of 'go' phrase, too. They are all correct. I like the phrase 'to go easy on someone' it is a good informal phrase to mean to not be too strong in the tackle or, more generally, to be more lenient with someone or less aggressive.

When describing the offside rule, I forgot about the idea of being level with the defender. I think in the past this used to be offside but the attacker gets the benefit of the doubt these days. 

Thanks for your message!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team


Rich's picture
Rich
17/05/2018 08:44
Spain
Liverpool
248

Well done, Milos. You're the first to get the football phrase this week. Good work on the different types of 'go' phrase, too. They are all correct. I like the phrase 'to go easy on someone' it is a good informal phrase to mean to not be too strong in the tackle or, more generally, to be more lenient with someone or less aggressive.

When describing the offside rule, I forgot about the idea of being level with the defender. I think in the past this used to be offside but the attacker gets the benefit of the doubt these days. 

Thanks for your message!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

Leaderboard

Top Scorers
RankNameScore
1kwesimanifest4395
2assemjuve3593
3aragorn19863527
4haydi3189
5Alex_from_Ukraine2706
6Ahmed Adam Mamado2469
7nikosonris2453
8Liubomyr2333
9MUGEMANYI2320
10elghoul2171
Country ranking
RankNameScore
1Ukraine24927
2Serbia24503
3Albania20333
4Macedonia19011
5Bosnia and Herzegovina16046
6Armenia13347
7Kosovo13071
8Georgia12349
9Spain9678
10Montenegro7894
Club ranking
RankNameScore
1Manchester United76858
2Arsenal55077
3Liverpool54212
4Chelsea44427
5Manchester City17189
6Leicester City9367
7Tottenham Hotspur5254
8Newcastle United4611
9West Ham United3795
10Watford2845

Level

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

Goals

Skills: Listening

Vocabulary: Phrases with go

Task: Work out some difficult phrases from context