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English & the UK: Manchester

English & the UK: Manchester

In this week's Premier Skills English Podcast, Jack and Rich continue a series of podcasts called 'English & the UK' which focus on Premier League cities. They will tell you more about what you can find in these cities and focus on some of the language you need when visiting places in these cities. The city they are visiting in this episode is Manchester and the language focus is on informal phrases to talk about football. You will hear a roleplay between a Manchester City fan and a Manchester United fan. Your task is to tell us about a football rivalry you know about. Don't forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have a new football phrase for you to guess, too. Enjoy!

Transcript

If the listening was a bit difficult, you can listen again and read the transcript at the same time.
Read the transcript and listen at the same time.

Welcome - English & the UK - Manchester (talking about football)

Jack: Hello my name’s Jack

Rich: and I’m Rich and welcome to this week’s Premier Skills English podcast

Jack: Where we talk about football and help you with your English.

Rich: We recommend that you listen to this podcast on the Premier Skills English website because that is where we have the transcript, language examples, activities, quizzes and a discussion page to help you understand everything we talk about.

Jack: However, if you’re listening on Spotify or Apple Podcasts, you can leave answers to our questions in the review section. We do read all the reviews and would love to hear from you. 

Rich: In this week’s podcast, we’re continuing our series of podcasts that focus on English and the UK. In these podcasts, you will learn more about cities in the UK and at the same time lots of useful English words and phrases.

Jack: In each podcast, we focus on one UK city. In our last podcast, we spoke about Liverpool, the Beatles, who are from Liverpool, and music.

Rich: And we looked at 10 music words in more detail. Words like tune, lyrics and gig. 

Jack: We also spoke about the Liverpool accent and words that are often only used in scouse and also why the Liverpool Derby is actually called the Merseyside Derby.

Rich: If you want to go back and do this lesson you can find it on the Premier Skills English website by clicking skills >  listen > podcasts. If you are on Spotify or Apple Podcasts you’ll find it in the playlist, it’s called ‘English & the UK: Liverpool’. 

Jack: In this episode, we are going to talk about the city that’s home to the Premier League Champions: Manchester. 

...

Rich: Before we start talking about Manchester I’m going to give Jack a little test.

Jack: A test? I don’t like exams.

Rich: It’s not an exam just a little test. It’s not too difficult. In the podcasts recently we’ve been talking about UK cities.

Jack: Yes, we’ve done podcasts about London, Birmingham, Liverpool and this one is about Manchester.

Rich: This little test is about UK cities too. I’m going to name a UK city and you have to say the first thing that pops into your head.

Jack: I think I can do that.

Rich: OK, let's go … London.

Jack: London Bridge, the Queen, Big Ben the Houses of Parliament.

Rich: Brighton.

Jack: Brighton beach, the sea, a pier, ice cream.

Rich: Birmingham.

Jack: Brummie accent, spaghetti junction er …

Rich: Liverpool.

Jack: The Beatles, scousers, docks.

Rich: Manchester.

Jack: Manchester United, City, football …

Rich: Enough. You passed the test.

Jack: How did I pass?

Rich: The first thing you connected to Manchester was football. Other UK cities are obsessed with football but there's probably not a city with a stronger association to the sport than Manchester.  

Jack: It’s true. I used to live in Manchester and when I was away from the city a question I was asked all the time was ‘United or City?’ They were always quite disappointed and a little confused when I said Arsenal.

Rich: So, in this week’s podcast we’re going to be speaking about Manchester and informal language football fans use to talk about important matches.

...

Jack: In a moment you’re going to hear us talking a little about Manchester.

Rich: We want to tell you a little about the city and what you could do there if you visited.

Jack: And then we’ll have a roleplay for you. In this week’s roleplay, you'll hear a Manchester United fan (that’ll be me) and a Manchester City fan (that’ll be Rich) talking football. 

Rich: And we’ll have lots of informal phrases fans use to talk about football matches.

Rich: In this week’s task, we’ll ask you about football rivalries that you know about. We’d like you to tell us about a city that has a strong football rivalry.

Jack: And don’t forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have a new football phrase for you to guess.

Football Phrase 

Jack: But, before we look at all that, let’s look at last week’s football phrase. If you didn’t hear it last week we’ll give you one more chance to guess and give you the correct answer at the end of the show when we give you a new football phrase.

Rich: Last week I gave you quite an unusual phrase to guess.

Jack: Yes, it was difficult. Liubomyr from Ukraine needed two guesses and he nearly always gets it right first time!

Rich: That’s the perfect challenge then and Liubomyr wasn’t the only listener to get it right. Romakisel from Russia and Coreuser from Saudi Arabia also got the right answer so well done to them!

Jack: OK, it wasn’t impossible but I’ll give everyone a phrase that is a bit easier this week.

Rich: That’s because you are too nice! Anyway, let’s give everyone one more chance to guess last week’s phrase and we’ll give you the answer at the end of the show. 

Jack: OK, here we go. Right, the football phrase was to ******* *** ****. This phrase is connected to getting the ball under control. It’s connected to your first touch. We often say he ********* *** **** beautifully when a player controls a long ball with his first touch. To ******* *** **** your body needs to be relaxed and not stiff or the ball may bounce away from you.

Rich: We’ll tell you the answer to this football phrase at the end of the show and Jack will also have a new football phrase for you to guess.

Conversation

Jack: You are now going to listen to us talking about some of the things to do and see in Manchester. 

Rich: While you listen, we want you to answer a question. The question is: 

Jack: Where can you see dinosaurs in Manchester?

...

Rich: So, imagine someone’s just arrived at Manchester Picadilly - Manchester’s main train station. They’ve never been to Manchester before. What would you tell them to do?

Jack: Get back on the train! No, I’m only joking. Manchester is a fantastic city and I lived there for many years. There are loads of things to do.

Rich: I’ve heard there’s a football museum.

Jack: OK, let’s start with the football stuff as there are a lot of football tourists in Manchester. You’re talking about the National Football Museum so it’s not about City or United it’s about the history of football and has lots of different collections and interactive exhibits. There’s even a penalty shootout simulator.

Rich: And then, of course, there is Old Trafford and the Etihad?

Jack: Yes, lots of people go to United’s and CIty’s grounds to watch a match but there are things to do on non-matchdays too.

Rich: They have museums.

Jack: Both stadiums have museums and you can visit, see the history of the clubs, see the trophy cabinets and take a tour of the stadiums.

Rich: And there’s shopping. 

Jack: Yes, both stadiums have megastores where you can buy all kinds of Manchester United and City merchandise.

Rich: Ok, so that’s the football. But what else is there to do in the city. Can you do a quick thirty-second summary?

Jack: Right, museums and art galleries. Manchester has some great ones. Visit the Science and Industry Museum and learn about the history of Manchester which is often named the world’s first industrialised city. Manchester Museum has dinosaurs, Manchester Art Gallery is worth a visit, the Lowry celebrates one of England’s best artists and you’ll find lots of interesting street art in the Northern Quarter. If you like shopping, Manchester city centre is fantastic and Manchester also has brilliant nightlife and a fantastic live music scene. 

Rich: You had five more seconds!

Introduction to Roleplay 

Jack: Did you get the answer to the question: Where can you see dinosaurs in Manchester?

Rich: The answer is the Manchester Museum. There’s actually a life-size fossil of a T-rex which I think is pretty cool.

Jack: Right, you are now going to listen to a roleplay.

Rich: You’re going to hear a Manchester United fan (that’s Jack) and a Manchester City fan (that’s me) talking about football.

Rich: After the roleplay, we’ll focus on some of the language we use.

Jack: While you listen we want you to answer a question:

Rich: What was the final score?

Roleplay

Jack: Did you watch the Derby then?

Rich: Of course, I did. I wasn’t going to mention it but seeing that you have …

Jack: I probably should’ve kept my mouth shut but to be honest we were robbed.

Rich: You think so. You have to be joking. You might’ve just shaded the first half but in the second half, we took you apart. 

Jack: Shaded the first half? I was gutted that we were only one-nil up at the break. We could’ve had three more at least. 

Rich: Three?

Jack: We hit the post, then the ref disallowed that goal for I don’t know what and then your keeper pulled off that unbelievable save.

Rich: So what are you blaming here? Bad finishing, dodgy refereeing or us for having a decent goalie?

Jack: Whatever. 

Rich: I think we got a bit of a rollicking at the break. We came out like a different team and what a goal!

Jack: Unbelievable. It was his first in nearly three years. It could only happen to us. A draw would’ve been a fair result I could’ve handled it but then for you lot to nick the winner like that.

Rich: What do you mean? You had your chances but it would’ve been a travesty if we’d not won that game.

Jack: Yeah but a dodgy penalty in the last minute? Come on!

Rich: Dodgy? It was a brilliant call by the ref!

Jack: Whatever!

Language Focus

Jack: Did you get the answer to the question? What was the final score?

Rich: Well we said that Jack was a Manchester United fan and I was a Manchester City fan. Jack’s team took the lead and were winning 1-0 at half-time but my team scored twice in the second half so the final score was Manchester City 2-1 Manchester United.

Jack: OK, let’s look at some language. Let’s start with some general things about how we usually talk about football and football teams.

Rich: When we talk about the team we support they are our team and we always use we to talk about our team.

Jack: When we talk as a fan we talk in a way that sounds like we were playing in the match too. Some examples from the roleplay are: ‘We could’ve scored three more’ or ‘we were robbed’.

Rich: And when you are talking to a fan of another team you use you to talk about their team. In the roleplay, you heard sentences such as ‘you might’ve shaded the first half’ or ‘you had your chances’. 

Jack: When we talk about other teams we use they. We say things like ‘I can’t believe they beat us’ or ‘they were so lucky’.

Rich: In British English, we usually use plural forms to refer to football teams. You will normally see things like ‘Manchester City have won the league’ or ‘Chelsea are on the attack’.

Jack: In American English, it’s more common to use the singular form and generally when we talk about the club in a more official way we also use the singular form.

Rich: Liverpool football club plays at Anfield. They are my team. I think it is actually something emotional too. We can’t refer to our team as an ‘it’.

...

Jack: Let’s look at some football vocabulary.

Rich: Most of the words we used in the roleplay are informal like most conversations about football. Let’s look at a few of the more difficult phrases we used.

Jack: Let’s start with the phrasal verb to take apart. I said to Rich ‘we took you apart’. It literally means to separate or dismantle. You might need to take apart a car engine if you have a problem - take all the different parts out of the car.

Rich: In football, to take apart is used to mean one team was far better than the other. 

Jack: Rich said that my team shaded the first half. When we say one team shaded something we are saying that one team was a little better than the other. 

Rich: Jack said his team was ‘one-nil up at the break’. At the break is another way of saying at half-time. We use nil and not zero when we talk about football scores -  one-nil, two-nil, three-nil and so on. 

Jack: And we say one-nil up to mean that a team is winning one-nil. We can also use ‘down’ to mean losing. Manchester United are 1-0 up or Manchester United are 2-1 down.

Rich: Gutted is a common football word. It means to be very disappointed. Football fans are disappointed if their team lose but are gutted when their team lose a local derby.

Jack: Goalkeepers are usually described just as keepers or sometimes more informally as goalies. It’s a keeper’s job to make saves but when they make a very good save we often use the phrasal verb to pull off. He pulled off an unbelievable save.

Rich: Let’s talk about referees or more informally just refs. Football fans often complain about dodgy decisions. Dodgy in a football context basically means bad. 

Jack: When a team is losing at half-time or at the break a manager may shout at the players. This can be described as a rollicking - an informal word to describe a manager shouting and criticising his players for poor performance.

Rich: You might also hear the phrase a kick up the backside. The manager gave the team a kick up the backside at the break. This is the same as a rollicking.

Jack: And one final phrase is to nick a winner. To nick is an informal phrase that means to steal or to rob. When a team nicks a winner it’s usually very late in the game and a draw would probably have been a fairer result.

Rich: That’s lots of vocabulary to talk about a match in an informal way. Try listening to the roleplay again and see if you can hear all these phrases we’ve been talking about.

Jack: We’ve also got activities on the Premier Skills English website to help you understand all the language we’ve used in this podcast.

Task

Jack: We’ve been talking about Manchester you heard a roleplay between a and City and United fan.

Rich: This week your task is to tell us about a city with a big football rivalry.

Jack: It can be a city in your country or a football rivalry you know well.

Rich: What city is it? What clubs are involved? Do you support one of the teams? What happens when the two clubs play each other? Why do you think the rivalry is so strong?

Jack: Write your comments on the Premier Skills English website.

This week’s football phrase:

Jack: OK, it’s time for this week’s football phrase. It’s my turn this week and I want as many people to get the right answer as possible.

Rich: So another easy one then. What’s the phrase ‘football’?

Jack: It won’t be that easy and anyway football isn’t a phrase it’s a word! This week’s football phrase is **** ** **** ********. This is a phrase that is used to describe two consecutive wins or two wins in a row. The phrase includes a part of the body.

Rich: OK not as easy as football. Let’s see who can get it right. Write your answers in the comments section on the Premier Skills English website and we’ll announce your name on next week’s show.

Jack: Ok, and before we finish here’s the answer to last week’s football phrase. It was difficult so well done if you got it right.  The answer was to cushion the ball. 

Rich: Right, that’s all we have time for this week. Bye for now and enjoy your football!

Vocabulary

How much did you understand?

In the podcast, Rich and Jack used some words and phrases that might be new for you. Do you know the words in bold?

Other UK cities are obsessed with football but there's probably not a city with a stronger association to the sport than Manchester. 

The National Football Museum isn't about City or United it’s about the history of football and has lots of different collections and interactive exhibits

Lots of people go to United’s and City’s grounds to watch a match but there are things to do on non-matchdays, too.

Manchester has brilliant nightlife and a fantastic live music scene. 

It would’ve been a travesty if we’d not won that game.

It was a brilliant call by the ref!

There were a few more tricky words and phrases in the podcast. Try the activity below, then, listen to the podcast again to hear how we used the words. This can really help your understanding.

Activity 1

Activity 1: In this activity, try to match the words and phrases to their definitions. All of the words were in this week's podcast.
Can you match the words to the definitions?

Media City UK in Manchester is home to the BBC and many other media companies.

UK Cities

Manchester

Manchester, as you probably know, is home to the current Premier League Champions (Manchester City) and as it's also home to one of the other biggest clubs in football (Manchester United) the city is a top destination for football fans from around the world. Manchester is fantastic for football fans; you can visit the National Football Museum and two of the biggest football clubs in the world. Both City and United offer tours and visits to their stadiums on non-matchdays. But, Manchester is much more than football. Let's find out a bit more about Manchester ...

You'll find lots of street art all over Manchester CIty centre.

Culture

The People 

Mancunian/Manc = the name for someone from Manchester (also the Manchester accent)

People from Manchester are called Mancunians or Mancs although Manc is often used in a negative way to describe Manchester United or City fans by fans of other clubs. Some famous Mancunians include:

  • Noel and Liam Gallagher (from the rock group Oasis)
  • Morrissey (singer from The Smiths)
  • Alan Turing (computer scientist: credited with creating modern computing)
  • Danny Boyle (film director: Trainspotting, Slumdog Millionaire, The Beach)
  • Emmeline Pankhurst (Political Activist: won women the right to vote in the UK)

Manchester City's Pep Guardiola and Noel Gallagher of the rock group, Oasis.

The Language

The Mancunian accent is an accent from Northern England so words such as 'glass' and 'grass' are pronounced with short 'a' /æ/ sound like in 'cat', not a long 'a' /ɑ:/ sound like in 'car'. There are also some specific phrases that are very common in Mancunian. here are a couple of examples:

Y'all right our kid? 

That's well mint that.

That is bobbins.

'Y'all right' is a common greeting and basically means 'How are you?'. 'Our kid' is how Mancunians describe a brother/sister or a very close friend.  If something is 'mint' it means it's very good but if something is 'bobbins' it's very bad. If you want to learn a bit more Mancunian watch this video. It shows the ex-Manchester City midfielder, Yaya Toure, trying to learn a few Manc phrases. He doesn't find it easy!

Manchester is known as the world's first industrialised city. This image is from around 1865.

Culture

The History/The City

During the industrial revolution, Manchester was famous for cotton production and producing textiles. The city grew and became known as the world's first industrialised city. More recently, the city has been regenerated. This was helped by the hosting of the Commonwealth Games in 2002 when lots of new sporting facilities were built; including the City of Manchester Stadium which following the games became the Etihad Stadium and the new home of Manchester City FC. The city centre has also been regenerated with many shopping and eating destinations including the UK's largest city-centre shopping centre.

The Music

Music plays a very important part in Manchester's culture. Many famous bands from the 1980s and 1990s were from the city and some of these bands also formed what was called the 'Madchester' music scene in the city. Some notable Manchester bands include:

  • Joy Division
  • The Smiths
  • The Buzzcocks
  • The Stone Roses
  • The Fall
  • The Happy Mondays
  • Oasis

Connecting music to football, the song most well-known as a Manchester United song is probably Glory, Glory Man United and the most famous song connected to Manchester City is undoubtedly Blue Moon.

The Manchester Derby would be on the list of matches to see for many football tourists.

The Football

Manchester United was created in 1878 but was originally called Newton Heath and played in green and yellow shirts. Newton Heath became Manchester United in 1902 and changed their shirt colour to red. The club moved to their current stadium, Old Trafford, in 1910. Manchester City was created in 1880 but was originally called West Gorton. The club changed its name to Manchester City in 1894. The team are the current Premier League Champions and are currently having the most successful time in their history.

"On derby day in Manchester, the city is cut in two. The Blues and the Reds invade the streets, and if your team wins the city belongs to you." Eric Cantona, ex-Manchester Utd player.

Language

Talking about football

In the second roleplay, Rich and Jack spoke about a match between Manchester City and Manchester United. In the roleplay, they used and described ten informal words or phrases that football fans often use to talk about what happened in a match. Take a look at these sentences from the podcast and check that you understand the words in bold.

You might’ve just shaded the first half but in the second half, we took you apart

I was gutted that we were only one-nil up at the break

Your keeper pulled off that unbelievable save.

So what are you blaming here? Bad finishing, dodgy refereeing or us for having a decent goalie?

I think we got a bit of a rollicking at the break. 

I could’ve handled it but then you lot nicked the winner like that.

Try the activity below, and complete the gaps with words and phrases you heard in this podcast.

Activity 2

Activity 2: In this activity, check that you have learned some of the key phrases from the podcast.
Can you write the word in each gap?

You can take a stadium tour of both Manchester's Premier League stadiums.

Quiz

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Task

A football rivalry

City and United are big rivals. What other football city rivalries do you know?

This week we want you to tell us about a football rivalry in your country or know well.

Manchester City and Manchester United are big rivals in Manchester. We want you to tell us about another city that has two big football rivals. You can write about:

  • A city in your country.
  • A rivalry you know about from another country.

Try to answer these questions:

  1. What city is it?
  2. What clubs are involved?
  3. Do you support one of the teams?
  4. What happens when the two clubs play each other?
  5. Why do you think the rivalry is so strong?

Write your answers in the comments section below and don't forget to make a guess at this week's football phrase!

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Comments

englishman
04/08/2019
DZ
1727
points

yes


englishman
04/08/2019 13:35
Algeria
Manchester City
1727

yes

garri10's picture
garri10
24/07/2019
MX
13
points

in Mexico City, Mexico, is very important “El Clásico Capitalino”. it is a derby between Pumas and América, two of the big four teams in the country. When the clash is coming, fans of both teams are very exited and sometimes we have clashes in the street between them. it is a hot game, it is a hot matchday. The rivalry is so strong because two teams are from Mexico City and both want to be owns of the city. this rivalry comes since 80’s when Pumas and América played three finals but one of its was very doubtful. Two championships were for América and the last one for Pumas.


garri10's picture
garri10
24/07/2019 05:53
Mexico
Liverpool
13

in Mexico City, Mexico, is very important “El Clásico Capitalino”. it is a derby between Pumas and América, two of the big four teams in the country. When the clash is coming, fans of both teams are very exited and sometimes we have clashes in the street between them. it is a hot game, it is a hot matchday. The rivalry is so strong because two teams are from Mexico City and both want to be owns of the city. this rivalry comes since 80’s when Pumas and América played three finals but one of its was very doubtful. Two championships were for América and the last one for Pumas.

Ronisanttos
17/07/2019
BR
33
points

In Rio, the biggest derby for me is the Fla-Flu, (Flamengo v Fluminense).
I support Flamengo, but I've never been to the game since it's a bit dangerous because of the cheerleading that happens occasionally. I think the rivalry occurs because Flamengo was originated from former players of Fluminense in its foundation year.


Ronisanttos
17/07/2019 12:28
Brazil
Manchester United
33

In Rio, the biggest derby for me is the Fla-Flu, (Flamengo v Fluminense).
I support Flamengo, but I've never been to the game since it's a bit dangerous because of the cheerleading that happens occasionally. I think the rivalry occurs because Flamengo was originated from former players of Fluminense in its foundation year.

lakerwang
13/07/2019
CN
295
points

In China, the professional football league started only 25 years ago, and football clubs don't have a long history. So the rivalry in derby matches isn't so strong as in England or other European countries. I believe it's going to get stronger as time goes on.

You mentioned Mancunians usually pronounce /?/ instead of /ɑ:/ in words such as "grass". It's a bit like American English, isn't it? I think The beatles also sang their songs in such a way like that. How do you think?
Speaking of prononciation, I sometimes would heard you making a plosive when you speaking "ng" sound. Does that a kind of accent?


lakerwang
13/07/2019 03:57
China
Chelsea
295

In China, the professional football league started only 25 years ago, and football clubs don't have a long history. So the rivalry in derby matches isn't so strong as in England or other European countries. I believe it's going to get stronger as time goes on.

You mentioned Mancunians usually pronounce /?/ instead of /ɑ:/ in words such as "grass". It's a bit like American English, isn't it? I think The beatles also sang their songs in such a way like that. How do you think?
Speaking of prononciation, I sometimes would heard you making a plosive when you speaking "ng" sound. Does that a kind of accent?

coreuser
10/07/2019
JO
220
points

**** ** **** ******** or wining


coreuser
10/07/2019 10:02
Jordan
Manchester City
220

**** ** **** ******** or wining

englishman
09/07/2019
DZ
1727
points

Hi every body
I have no idea about the phrase
talking about Manchester football is very funny.


englishman
09/07/2019 10:35
Algeria
Manchester City
1727

Hi every body
I have no idea about the phrase
talking about Manchester football is very funny.

romakisel
08/07/2019
RU
69
points

**** ** **** winnings


romakisel
08/07/2019 16:08
Russia
Tottenham Hotspur
69

**** ** **** winnings

elghoul's picture
elghoul
08/07/2019
DZ
3368
points

It is known as the Titteri derby and it stands for the great matches between Tiaret and Sougueur. You perhaps don't believe it but this derby between the wheat City of Tiaret and the sheep town of Sougueur is not built on football rivalry since the Tiaret club is more higherly known than the Sougueur football club. But during seasons of bad luck for Tiaret players as they are relegated to the Sougueur level the Tiaret footballers had to travel to this twenty kms far where all fans and players had to suffer all type of violence and the worst of them are the stones that these just uncivilised persons throw against the visitors. It is not a matter of football in fact just an existentiel rivalry.


elghoul's picture
elghoul
08/07/2019 15:47
Algeria
Manchester City
3368

It is known as the Titteri derby and it stands for the great matches between Tiaret and Sougueur. You perhaps don't believe it but this derby between the wheat City of Tiaret and the sheep town of Sougueur is not built on football rivalry since the Tiaret club is more higherly known than the Sougueur football club. But during seasons of bad luck for Tiaret players as they are relegated to the Sougueur level the Tiaret footballers had to travel to this twenty kms far where all fans and players had to suffer all type of violence and the worst of them are the stones that these just uncivilised persons throw against the visitors. It is not a matter of football in fact just an existentiel rivalry.

elghoul's picture
elghoul
07/07/2019
DZ
3368
points

football phrase, **** ** **** *********.


elghoul's picture
elghoul
07/07/2019 13:05
Algeria
Manchester City
3368

football phrase, **** ** **** *********.

coreuser
07/07/2019
JO
220
points

For the football phrase:
Is that winning streak ?


coreuser
07/07/2019 10:36
Jordan
Manchester City
220

For the football phrase:
Is that winning streak ?

coreuser
09/07/2019
JO
220
points

This time I stuck with the phrase!
Please don't tell me it is back to back victories or wining ?


coreuser
09/07/2019 18:02
Jordan
Manchester City
220

This time I stuck with the phrase!
Please don't tell me it is back to back victories or wining ?

Rich's picture
Rich
10/07/2019
ES
444
points

Hi Coreuser
The phrase is back to back victories! You can also say back to back wins but not back to back winnings.
Hope that helps!
Rich - The Premier Skills English Team


Rich's picture
Rich
10/07/2019 15:18
Spain
Liverpool
444

Hi Coreuser
The phrase is back to back victories! You can also say back to back wins but not back to back winnings.
Hope that helps!
Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

coreuser
11/07/2019
JO
220
points

Thanks Rich for clarifying.
I ruled out the phrase "back-to-back" because it has been already spoken in same context. I was looking for another phrases.
However, it is super easy this time.


coreuser
11/07/2019 13:24
Jordan
Manchester City
220

Thanks Rich for clarifying.
I ruled out the phrase "back-to-back" because it has been already spoken in same context. I was looking for another phrases.
However, it is super easy this time.

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3wsanta3935
4assemjuve3705
5Liubomyr3685
6aragorn19863557
7elghoul3368
8haydi3189
9Ahmed Adam Mamado2869
10milos2546
Country ranking
RankNameScore
1Colombia69675
2Ukraine29562
3Serbia26828
4Albania20448
5Spain20079
6Macedonia19058
7Bosnia and Herzegovina16248
8Armenia13611
9Vietnam13218
10Kosovo13125
Club ranking
RankNameScore
1Manchester United123461
2Liverpool82808
3Chelsea71221
4Arsenal68392
5Manchester City40232
6Leicester City11010
7Tottenham Hotspur8439
8Newcastle United7462
9West Ham United4644
10Watford4366

Level

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

Goals

Skills: Listening

Language: Informal phrases to talk about football

Task: A football rivalry