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Fred the Red.

Learning Vocabulary: Mascots & Nicknames

Learning Vocabulary: Mascots & Nicknames

In this week's Premier Skills English Podcast, Jack is talking about a competition in his local newspaper. His town has a new football club and they need a new mascot and nickname. Who will have the best ideas? Jack? Rich? Or you? The language focus is on the language of giving reasons and the difference between because and because of. Your task is to decide on a nickname and mascot for the new football club in Jack's town. Don't forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have a new football phrase for you to guess.

Transcript

If the listening was a bit difficult, you can listen again and read the transcript at the same time.
Read and listen at the same time.

Learning Vocabulary: Nicknames & Mascots

Introduction

Jack: Hello my name’s Jack
 
Rich: and I’m Rich and welcome to this week’s Premier Skills English podcast
 
Jack: Where we talk about football and help you with your English.
 
Rich: We recommend that you listen to this podcast on the Premier Skills English website because that is where we have the transcript, language examples, activities, quizzes and a discussion page to help you understand everything we talk about.
 
Jack: However, if you’re listening on Apple Podcasts, you can leave answers to our questions in the review section. We do read all the reviews and would love to hear from you. 
  
Rich: We are also looking for more people to interview in our podcasts. 
  
Jack: If you want to practise your English skills and answer a  few questions just email us at premierskills@britishcouncil.org and we’ll write back to you.
 
Rich: Don’t forget that we have our football English podcast called This Week that you can listen to at the start of every week. This week’s episode is about the New Year matches in the Premier League and the FA Cup.
  
Jack: Some of the football words and phrases we look at include to taste defeat, a hangover and a cupset.  
 
Rich: It’s on the Premier Skills English homepage, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts and lots of other places right now! 
 
Jack: In last week’s podcast, we spoke about New Year’s resolutions. I shared three of my New Year’s resolutions and many of you shared your New Year’s resolutions in the comments section on the Premier Skills English website.
 
Rich: My favourite was Hubertoo from Poland. One of his New Year’s resolutions is to guess every football phrase on the Premier Skills English website.
 
Jack: That’s a great resolution but my favourite was wsanta from Argentina. His New Year’s resolution is to sleep more!
 
Rich: Come on! That’s just lazy! If you want to go back and complete our lesson on New Year’s resolutions, tell us your New Year’s resolutions and join in the discussion, where will people find the lesson, Jack?
 
Jack: You need to go to the Premier Skills English website,  click skills, click listen and click podcasts. You will see it there along with over 200 other podcasts. It’s called Understanding Grammar: New Year’s resolutions. 
 
Rich: In this week’s podcast, we’re going to talk about football club nicknames and mascots.
 
Jack: What? Like Arsenal’s nickname is the Gunners, Norwich’s nickname is the Canaries and Manchester United are called the Red Devils.
 
Rich: Yes, but you might not know that Arsenal’s mascot is a dinosaur called Gunnersaurus, Norwich’s mascot is called Captain Canary and Manchester United’s mascot is called Fred the Red.
 
Jack: In this week’s roleplay, we’re going to be talking about a new mascot and nickname for the football club in my town.
 
Rich: And after the roleplay, we’ll look at some vocabulary connected to giving reasons and making your point.
 
Jack: Before all that though, we need to look at last week’s football phrase.

Last week’s Football Phrase 

Rich: If you didn’t hear our football phrase last week we’re going to give you one more chance to guess now. We’ll give you the correct answer at the end of the show when we give you a new football phrase.
 
Jack: Well done if you got it right last week and congratulations to those of you who wrote the correct answer on the Premier Skills English website.
 
Rich: Liubomyr from Ukraine was the first to get the phrase right last week. Well done, Liubomyr. And well done to Ahmed Adam from Sudan, Milos from Serbia, Fred Zhong and Lakerwang from China, Idzingirai from Zimbabwe, Elghoul from Algeria and finally Hubertoo from Poland who also got the right answer.
 
Jack: Remember you can also write your answers in the review section on Apple Podcasts if that’s where you listen to us. 
 
Rich: Let’s hear last week’s phrase one more time. Do you know what the phrase is?
 
Jack: The football phrase was the ******* ******* ******. The New Year is a busy time for football clubs because on the first day of the year the ******* ******** ****** opens. This gives a chance to clubs to buy and sell players. They have to be quick though because the ******* ******** ****** is only open for a month.
 
Rich: We’ll give you the answer at the end of the show and we’ll have a new football phrase for you to guess. 

Introduction to Roleplay

Jack: In this week’s roleplay, you are going to hear us talking about a new nickname and a new mascot for my local football team.
 
Rich: While you are listening, we want you to answer two questions.
 
Jack: Question number one: What do I think the new nickname and mascot for the football club should be?
 
Rich: Question number two: What do I think the new nickname and mascot for the football club should be?

Roleplay

Rich: So I hear your two local football teams are merging. 
 
Jack: Yes, the Ludlow Colts and Ludlow Athletic will be no more. They are joining forces to become one big super club.
 
Rich: I imagine Manchester United and Liverpool are quaking in their boots because of this new super club!
 
Jack: Well, some of the other teams in the West Midlands Regional Football League might be a bit worried because we’ll be a much bigger team.
 
Rich: Right. But what are they going to be called? They can’t be called the Colts and they can’t be called Athletic anymore.
 
Jack: That’s true. That’s why the Ludlow Express - our local newspaper - is running a competition to choose a new nickname and mascot for the club.
 
Rich: What a great idea! The colts - that’s a young horse, right? I’ve never liked that nickname and Athletic is really boring probably because loads of teams have that name. It doesn’t really stand for anything.
 
Jack: The winning idea will be on the club’s badge so it’s got to be good. And er … I’m not really sure I should tell you this but I’ve been asked by the club to dress up as the mascot on the opening day of the season.
 
Rich: Really? Really? Are they paying you?
 
Jack: No, but I’ll be collecting money for charity.
 
Rich: That’s hilarious … let me think seriously about this mascot idea.
 
Jack: Yes, I could really do with some help. I don’t want to be dressed up as something too silly. 
 
Rich: I’m sure that won’t happen! There are some really weird mascots out there you know. Southend United’s mascot is Elvis the Eel. How can an eel be a mascot? It hasn’t got any legs! Can it kick a ball? It’d probably scare the kids! Does it sing?
 
Jack: No idea but Southend don’t have a great record on mascots. Elvis the Eel replaced Sammy the Shrimp! 
 
Rich: You’re joking!
 
Jack: No, I’m not. Anyway, Ludlow is nowhere near the sea so no fish or random sea creatures.
 
Rich: Right, OK so we need a mascot that can kick a ball. What about a lion or a leopard. The Ludlow Lions or the Ludlow Leopards sounds good. It symbolises strength and you want the team to be strong.
 
Jack: Yeah, but there’s not much connection with the local community or countryside there. Not many lions or leopards in Ludlow.
 
Rich: OK, something that represents the local community. What about the Ludlow Ladybirds?
 
Jack: I don’t think so. Let’s get away from this ‘l’ thing. The nickname and town don’t have to begin with the same letter.
 
Rich: OK, great. What about the Ludlow bulls? Lots of cows around here.
 
Jack: Well, that would work, cows could symbolise the farming community, except you’d probably need two people in the costume and who’d want to be the back part of a bull or cow on matchday? 
 
Rich: True. You wouldn’t be able to watch the match.
 
Jack: And just down the road there’s the Hereford Bulls. 
 
Rich: Hmmm. They wouldn’t be happy. 
 
Jack: Do you want to hear my idea?
 
Rich: Go on then.
 
Jack: We’d be called the Ludlow Badgers and the mascot would be Brian the Badger.
 
Rich: Badgers? Go on.
 
Jack: Well, there are lots of badgers that live in this part of England. So it would be representing us. They’re strong but also cute with their black and white striped noses.
 
Rich: I like it. It’s a bit like the Wolves or the Foxes. I could see the Badgers in the Premier League.
 
Jack: And the team could play in black and white stripes.
 
Rich: Yes, like badgers. But the mascot - Brian the badger. Brian? Why do you want to be called Brian?
 
Jack: You don’t like it? It’s only going to be me for one match you know!
 
Rich: I like the ‘b’ thing but maybe another name. What about Becks or Bobby or Benji?
 
Jack: Benji Badger ... Maybe. So, have you come up with an idea then?
 
Rich: Yep, my idea is your team will be known as the Ludlow Chickens and the mascot, you, will be Charlie Chicken.
 
Jack: Are you serious?
 
Rich: Yeah, I can imagine it now. You running up and down the touchline clucking, I mean cheering and shouting come on you chickens! I’m going to write to the newspaper now.

Language Focus

Jack: Did you get the answers to our questions about the roleplay? 
 
Rich: We asked you for the nicknames and mascots we chose for Jack’s local football team.
 
Jack: My choice of nickname was the Ludlow Badgers and my mascot will be called Brian the Badger.
 
Rich: My choice of nickname was the Ludlow Chickens and my mascot will be called Jack, sorry, my mascot will be called Charlie Chicken.
 
Jack: Right, let’s look at some of the language we used in the roleplay. 
 
Rich: Jack was looking for a nickname that represents his local community. Where he lives, there are lots of farms so we spoke about bulls representing the farming community.
 
Jack: To represent something here means to be a symbol of the community. Choosing a cow or bull or another farm animal as a nickname would represent this community. 
 
Rich: This happens a lot. In the Premier League, Brighton’s nickname is the Seagulls which represents the sea as Brighton is next to the coast or West Ham are called the Irons because it represents the team’s industrial past.
 
Jack: We could use symbolises in a similar way. The nickname ‘the Irons’ symbolises West Ham’s industrial past.
 
Rich: I mentioned we could have Ludlow lions as a nickname because it symbolises strength.
 
Jack: Lots of teams go down this route, too. Chelsea’s nickname is the Lions and Wolverhampton Wanderers are obviously called Wolves.
 
Rich: This is even more common in American Sports. Think the Chicago Bulls, Dallas Cowboys or the New York Giants.
 
Jack: We can use a couple of different words to replace represent or symbolise. We can say that the nickname expresses strength or shows a connection between the team and the local community.
 
Rich: Another useful phrase is to stand for. What do you want a team to stand for, what values do you want something to represent?
 
Jack: In the roleplay, Rich said that the team name ‘Athletic’ doesn’t stand for anything because the name is so common but maybe the Lions might stand for strength and courage.
 
Rich: Let’s look at a bit of language we use to give reasons.
 
Jack: Rich said that my local football club needed to change its name and I replied by saying ‘that’s why the newspaper is running a competition’.
 
Rich: ‘That’s why’ is a very common way to give a reason for something. Listen to these:
 
Jack: You’re Spanish is not that good.
 
Rich: That’s why I go to classes.
 
Jack: My car broke down that’s why I had to walk.
 
Jack: It’s raining.
 
Rich: That’s why I’m taking an umbrella.
 
Jack: It’s also common to use ‘that’s why’ when you are being a bit sarcastic. A student might ask a teacher why they have to do something and the teacher might reply ‘because I’m the teacher. That’s why’.
 
Rich: We usually say ‘that’s why’ instead of saying ‘that’s the reason why’ as it’s not usually important to say the full form.
 
Jack: The most common word to give a reason is probably the word ‘because’ and you can probably use it without any problems but there is one thing that is worth looking at.
 
Rich: That’s the difference between ‘because’ and ‘because of’. The main difference between the two is the form or the structure. We use the words in a different way but the meaning is often the same.
 
Jack: Let’s look at an example. Rich said that ‘Manchester United and Liverpool are quaking in their boots because of this new super club! ‘Because of’ is a preposition and needs to be followed by a noun phrase; so Rich said the teams were scared ‘because of this new super club’.
 
Rich: Then Jack responded by saying ‘because we’ll be a much bigger team’. He used ‘because’ not ‘because of’. Because is a conjunction which links two parts of a sentence together and is followed by the subject and a verb phrase. So, he said ‘because we will be much bigger’.
 
Jack: So, ‘because’ is followed by a verb phrase and ‘because of’ is usually followed by a noun phrase. Let’s look at some simple examples:
 
Rich: I’m staying in because it’s raining.
 
Jack: I’m staying in because of the rain.
 
Rich: We didn’t win because their goalkeeper was so good.
 
Jack: We didn’t win because of the goalkeeper’s amazing performance.
 
Rich: We want to see you using some of this language in this week’s task but don’t forget to look at the explanations and activities on the website page for more useful words and phrases.

Task

Rich: This week’s task is to decide on a nickname and mascot for Jack’s new football team.
 
Jack: You can choose my idea - the Ludlow Badgers and Brian the Badger.
 
Rich: Or my idea - the Ludlow Chickens and Charlie the Chicken.
 
Jack: Or you may want to share your own idea.
 
Rich: The most important thing is to give reasons why you haven’t chosen one idea or ideas and why you have chosen what you have chosen.
 
Jack: Write all your ideas for nicknames and mascots at the bottom of the page on the Premier Skills English website.
 
Rich: And don’t forget to reply to other listeners and say what you think about their ideas.

Football Phrase

Rich: OK, it’s time for this week’s football phrase. It’s your turn this week, Jack.
 
Jack: This week’s football phrase is *****-*******. This phrase is used when a team from a lower division beats a team from a higher division in a cup competition. Last week, Wayne Rooney’s Derby County knocked out Premier League Crystal Palace in the FA Cup. It was a *****-*******. Another good example of a *****-******* is when Bradford City from the third division knocked Chelsea out of the cup in 2015. 
 
Rich: You could probably give everyone a bit more help here.
 
Jack: OK, well, if you know a famous children’s story about a boy called Jack it will help you guess the answer. Jack climbs a big plant and finds someone who is really big. The big bloke dies in an unfortunate accident.
 
Rich: That should help. I think. Before we leave you we need to tell you last week’s football phrase. The answer was the January transfer window.
 
Jack: Right, that’s all we have time for this week! Don’t forget to write your answers to our questions and make a guess at our football phrase in the comments below. If you get it right, we’ll announce your name on next week’s show. 
 
Rich: If you have any questions or comments or suggestions for the podcast or anything football or English related, you can leave them on the website in the comments section, on social media - on facebook or twitter, on apple podcasts or you can email us at premierskills@britishcouncil.org.
 
Jack: Remember you can also email us if you want to practise your English skills and answer a few questions for a future podcast.
 
Rich: Bye for now and enjoy your football!

Vocabulary

How much did you understand?

In the podcast, Rich and Jack used some words and phrases that might be new for you. Do you know the words in bold?

I hear your two local football teams are merging.

I imagine Manchester United and Liverpool are quaking in their boots because of this new super club!

That’s why the Ludlow Express - our local newspaper - is running a competition to choose a new nickname and mascot for the club.

The winning idea will be on the club’s badge so it’s got to be good. 

That’s hilarious … let me think seriously about this mascot idea.

And the team could play in black and white stripes.

You - running up and down the touchline clucking!

There were a few more tricky words in the podcast. Do you know what they all mean? Try the activity below, then, listen to the podcast again to hear how we used the words.

Activity 1

Activity 1: In this activity, try to match the words and phrases to their definitions.
Can you match the words to their definitions?

Sheffield Utd's nickname is the Blades and their mascot is Captain Blade.

Language

Giving Reasons: Vocabulary

In the podcast, Jack and Rich were thinking of ideas for a mascot and nickname for the new football club in Jack's town. They gave reasons for their ideas. Have a look at the words in bold. Do you understand them? 

I’ve never liked that nickname and Athletic is really boring probably because loads of teams have that name. It doesn’t really stand for anything.

The Ludlow Lions or the Ludlow Leopards sounds good. It symbolises strength and you want the team to be strong.

Brighton’s nickname is the Seagulls which represents the sea as Brighton is next to the coast.

The nickname ‘the Irons’ symbolises West Ham’s industrial past.

Norwich City's nickname is the Canaries and their mascot is Captain Canary.

Language

Giving Reasons: Language

In the podcast, Jack and Rich spoke about a few bits of language that we use to give reasons. The first phrase they spoke about was 'that's why'. 'That’s why’ is a very common way to give a reason for something. Look at these examples from the podcast:

A: Your Spanish is not that good. B: That’s why I go to classes.
 
A: My car broke down that’s why I had to walk.
 
A: It’s raining. B: That’s why I’m taking an umbrella.
Another very common way to give reasons is using the words 'because' and 'because of'. In the podcast, Rich and Jack looked at the differences between the two.

Because of

‘Because of’ is a preposition and needs to be followed by a noun phrase. Look at these examples from the podcast:

Manchester United and Liverpool are quaking in their boots because of this new super club!

I’m staying in because of the rain.

We didn’t win because of the goalkeeper’s amazing performance.

Southend United's mascot is Elvis J. Eel. Jellied eels are a traditional food in the south east of England. Have you ever tried them? Do you know what they are?

Because

'Because' is a conjunction and needs to be followed by a verb phrase. Look at these examples from the podcast:

Teams will be worried because we’ll be a bigger team.

I’m staying in because it’s raining.

We didn’t win because their goalkeeper was so good.

In this activity, take a look at the sentences and decide if you should be using 'because' or 'because of'.

Activity 2

Activity 2: Look at the sentences and decide whether to use 'because' or 'because of'.
What's the difference?

West Brom's nickname is the Baggies and their mascot is Boiler Man! Click on the image to find out more!

Quiz

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Task

Choose a mascot and nickname for Jack's football team

Sky Blue Sam is Coventry' City's mascot. Yes, it's an elephant!

In this podcast, Jack and Rich spoke about possible nicknames and mascots for the new football club in Jack's town. We want you to decide if Jack's ideas are best, Rich's ideas are best or if you have a better idea!

What have you decided:

  1. Nickname: The Ludlow Badgers Mascot: Brian the Badger
  2. Nickname: The Ludlow Chickens Mascot: Charlie the Chicken
  3. Nickname: My idea Mascot: My idea

Give reasons for your decisions and write your answers in the comments section below and don't forget to make a guess at this week's football phrase!

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Comentários

Robert Tavares's picture
Robert Tavares
13/01/2020
BR
8
points

Hi lads!
I think Jack's idea is better than Rich's because chickes are not so strong like other animals.
However, I have another idea.
The Nickname can be Ludlow Castles. This is a great atraction of the city. The Mascot can be a Dragon. It's a very strong mythological animal. I'd like to support a strong team like a drogon.

By!


Robert Tavares's picture
Robert Tavares
13/01/2020 20:39
Brazil
Liverpool
8

Hi lads!
I think Jack's idea is better than Rich's because chickes are not so strong like other animals.
However, I have another idea.
The Nickname can be Ludlow Castles. This is a great atraction of the city. The Mascot can be a Dragon. It's a very strong mythological animal. I'd like to support a strong team like a drogon.

By!

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Castles and dragons? A couple of you have said this now - it's a good idea. Ludlow has a castle so that would work but the dragon is the national symbol of Wales and Ludlow is in England near the Welsh border so I'm not so sure. Maybe better for a Welsh team?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Dragon

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:49
Spain
Liverpool
444

Castles and dragons? A couple of you have said this now - it's a good idea. Ludlow has a castle so that would work but the dragon is the national symbol of Wales and Ludlow is in England near the Welsh border so I'm not so sure. Maybe better for a Welsh team?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Dragon

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

lakerwang
13/01/2020
CN
301
points

I don't think going for chickens as the nickname is a good idea. You know, "chicken" means "a coward".
I'd rather choose "badgers". A club with badgers on the badge, badgers on the badge, badges on the badger...is your tongue twisted?

The football phrase is "*****-*******"


lakerwang
13/01/2020 15:51
China
Chelsea
301

I don't think going for chickens as the nickname is a good idea. You know, "chicken" means "a coward".
I'd rather choose "badgers". A club with badgers on the badge, badgers on the badge, badges on the badger...is your tongue twisted?

The football phrase is "*****-*******"

wsanta's picture
wsanta
16/01/2020
AR
3991
points

Ha ha ha, hilarious your tongue twister


wsanta's picture
wsanta
16/01/2020 03:17
Argentina
Liverpool
3991

Ha ha ha, hilarious your tongue twister

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

This is great! I might ask other listeners to try this in the podcast this week!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:46
Spain
Liverpool
444

This is great! I might ask other listeners to try this in the podcast this week!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

rasit2643
13/01/2020
TR
4
points

I think Jack's idea is better because the badger is both sympathetic and aggressive when necessary.


rasit2643
13/01/2020 15:08
Turkey
Chelsea
4

I think Jack's idea is better because the badger is both sympathetic and aggressive when necessary.

milos
13/01/2020
RS
2575
points

I think this week football phrase is upset victory


milos
13/01/2020 06:49
Serbia
Manchester United
2575

I think this week football phrase is upset victory

Rafael Robson's picture
Rafael Robson
13/01/2020
BR
476
points

Jack's idea is the best: The Ludlow Badgers, especially if they play in black and white stripes, like those fearless animals (e.g. the honey badgers).

I think the phrase is "*****-*******".


Rafael Robson's picture
Rafael Robson
13/01/2020 01:57
Brazil
Tottenham Hotspur
476

Jack's idea is the best: The Ludlow Badgers, especially if they play in black and white stripes, like those fearless animals (e.g. the honey badgers).

I think the phrase is "*****-*******".

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Honey badgers are definitely stronger than the badgers you find in Ludlow :)


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:45
Spain
Liverpool
444

Honey badgers are definitely stronger than the badgers you find in Ludlow :)

wsanta's picture
wsanta
12/01/2020
AR
3991
points

I looked for Ludlow on google maps is a beautiful place, I saw some castle and as it's near Wales I thought of a red dragon as a mascot because of the legend, perhaps it could be called Mondragon the dragon. Mondragón was called a boss I once had but he didn't throw fire through his mouth. But however I choose Jack's idea.


wsanta's picture
wsanta
12/01/2020 04:59
Argentina
Liverpool
3991

I looked for Ludlow on google maps is a beautiful place, I saw some castle and as it's near Wales I thought of a red dragon as a mascot because of the legend, perhaps it could be called Mondragon the dragon. Mondragón was called a boss I once had but he didn't throw fire through his mouth. But however I choose Jack's idea.

wsanta's picture
wsanta
12/01/2020
AR
3991
points

My family laughed a lot when you talked about me. I choose Jack's idea because it's brilliant. I don't like the idea that the mascot or nickname is a chicken because in Argentina if a team is called a chicken or hen it's derogatory, a team without temperament that they start winning and end up losing, we say that it is a cold chest team, I guess in English it doesn't have the same connotation. When a provocative player visits the stadium of a team known as cold chest, he rubs his chest and pretends to be cold, then everyone talks about that.


wsanta's picture
wsanta
12/01/2020 04:53
Argentina
Liverpool
3991

My family laughed a lot when you talked about me. I choose Jack's idea because it's brilliant. I don't like the idea that the mascot or nickname is a chicken because in Argentina if a team is called a chicken or hen it's derogatory, a team without temperament that they start winning and end up losing, we say that it is a cold chest team, I guess in English it doesn't have the same connotation. When a provocative player visits the stadium of a team known as cold chest, he rubs his chest and pretends to be cold, then everyone talks about that.

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

We're happy that you enjoyed it. I hope they were laughing with you and not at you :) The word chicken has a negative (and usually derogatory) meaning in English, too but maybe a slightly different meaning. It can be used as a verb, adjective or a noun and it describes someone who is scared of something or being scared. 'He didn't take the penalty because he was chicken', 'He chickened out of taking the penalty.' 'He didn't take the penalty. He's a chicken.' 

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:43
Spain
Liverpool
444

We're happy that you enjoyed it. I hope they were laughing with you and not at you :) The word chicken has a negative (and usually derogatory) meaning in English, too but maybe a slightly different meaning. It can be used as a verb, adjective or a noun and it describes someone who is scared of something or being scared. 'He didn't take the penalty because he was chicken', 'He chickened out of taking the penalty.' 'He didn't take the penalty. He's a chicken.' 

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

wsanta's picture
wsanta
15/01/2020
AR
3991
points

Thank you very much Rich. I understood what you explain to me


wsanta's picture
wsanta
15/01/2020 22:32
Argentina
Liverpool
3991

Thank you very much Rich. I understood what you explain to me

hubertoo's picture
hubertoo
11/01/2020
PL
24
points

Hmm... It's hard to say which proposition is better. I don't know all details about the team, so I have no others idea to good nicknames and mascot. I think Rich idea is better because it's funny ;)

I want to continue my seriers of good answers, so I think this week's football phrase is: upset occurs


hubertoo's picture
hubertoo
11/01/2020 20:46
Poland
Liverpool
24

Hmm... It's hard to say which proposition is better. I don't know all details about the team, so I have no others idea to good nicknames and mascot. I think Rich idea is better because it's funny ;)

I want to continue my seriers of good answers, so I think this week's football phrase is: upset occurs

hubertoo's picture
hubertoo
13/01/2020
PL
24
points

Hmm... It's harder than I've thought, but I this time I say: *****-*******


hubertoo's picture
hubertoo
13/01/2020 20:02
Poland
Liverpool
24

Hmm... It's harder than I've thought, but I this time I say: *****-*******

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Good work, Hubertoo and I'm happy to see you prefer my idea. Most other people seem to prefer badgers to chickens! I have no idea why :)


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:38
Spain
Liverpool
444

Good work, Hubertoo and I'm happy to see you prefer my idea. Most other people seem to prefer badgers to chickens! I have no idea why :)

wsanta's picture
wsanta
11/01/2020
AR
3991
points

I think the football phrase can be "*****-slaying"


wsanta's picture
wsanta
11/01/2020 18:47
Argentina
Liverpool
3991

I think the football phrase can be "*****-slaying"

wsanta's picture
wsanta
11/01/2020
AR
3991
points

I think I found a mistake where it says "You’re Spanish is not that good. That’s why I go to classes" maybe it should say "Your Spanish is not that good. That’s why I go to classes".
We don't want to make King Juan Carlos angry :)


wsanta's picture
wsanta
11/01/2020 11:55
Argentina
Liverpool
3991

I think I found a mistake where it says "You’re Spanish is not that good. That’s why I go to classes" maybe it should say "Your Spanish is not that good. That’s why I go to classes".
We don't want to make King Juan Carlos angry :)

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Thanks for spotting that, Wsanta. I've changed it now. Juan Carlos has retired so I'm sure he wouldn't mind :)


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:37
Spain
Liverpool
444

Thanks for spotting that, Wsanta. I've changed it now. Juan Carlos has retired so I'm sure he wouldn't mind :)

Takuya's picture
Takuya
11/01/2020
JP
15
points

The best name I think is Jack’s nickname and mascot.
That’s why it’s cooler than Rich’s. I think It’s important.
Sorry Rich.
The phrase this week is “*****-******* “.


Takuya's picture
Takuya
11/01/2020 08:53
Japan
Tottenham Hotspur
15

The best name I think is Jack’s nickname and mascot.
That’s why it’s cooler than Rich’s. I think It’s important.
Sorry Rich.
The phrase this week is “*****-******* “.

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Don't worry, Takuya. Badgers are cooler than chickens for sure!


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:36
Spain
Liverpool
444

Don't worry, Takuya. Badgers are cooler than chickens for sure!

Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
11/01/2020
SD
2876
points

First up, the football phrase. I guess it's "***** ****er".


Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
11/01/2020 07:09
Sudan
Liverpool
2876

First up, the football phrase. I guess it's "***** ****er".

Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
13/01/2020
SD
2876
points

Alright then. "*****-*******"


Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture
Ahmed Adam Mamado
13/01/2020 04:03
Sudan
Liverpool
2876

Alright then. "*****-*******"

ldzingirai's picture
ldzingirai
11/01/2020
ZW
1610
points

Football Phrase

This week's phrase is cupset. The phrase was in Matchweek 21 episode, vocabulary alert section. It is a portmanteau word which play around with the word cup and upset.


ldzingirai's picture
ldzingirai
11/01/2020 02:33
Zimbabwe
Chelsea
1610

Football Phrase

This week's phrase is cupset. The phrase was in Matchweek 21 episode, vocabulary alert section. It is a portmanteau word which play around with the word cup and upset.

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

The word we're looking for has a similar meaning but it's not this one. Have a listen to what Jack says after my definition - that should help!


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:35
Spain
Liverpool
444

The word we're looking for has a similar meaning but it's not this one. Have a listen to what Jack says after my definition - that should help!

Fred Zhong
10/01/2020
CN
72
points

From the roleplay,I'm curious about the local football in UK,have you been following any real local football team playing in your regional league?Are they professional or amateur?


Fred Zhong
10/01/2020 14:15
China
Manchester United
72

From the roleplay,I'm curious about the local football in UK,have you been following any real local football team playing in your regional league?Are they professional or amateur?

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Hi Fred,

The top four divisions in English football are all professional - that's 92 professional clubs. After that, we move into non-league football. The top division of non-league football is still played on a national level and many of the teams are professional in this league too and are trying to earn promotion and break into the professional leagues. After that, we have regional divisions that get more and more localised as you go down the divisions. All of these teams will be amateur.

The FA Cup is an interesting competition because all of these amateur teams can enter the competition and can theoretically play a Premier League team in the later rounds.

I've never followed a non-league team but I know plenty of people that do. My uncle follows Morpeth Town who play in the Northern Premier League Premier Division. THat's the seventh level of English football. They get about 500 fans at home matches and he loves it!

Let us know if you have any other questions!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

 


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:33
Spain
Liverpool
444

Hi Fred,

The top four divisions in English football are all professional - that's 92 professional clubs. After that, we move into non-league football. The top division of non-league football is still played on a national level and many of the teams are professional in this league too and are trying to earn promotion and break into the professional leagues. After that, we have regional divisions that get more and more localised as you go down the divisions. All of these teams will be amateur.

The FA Cup is an interesting competition because all of these amateur teams can enter the competition and can theoretically play a Premier League team in the later rounds.

I've never followed a non-league team but I know plenty of people that do. My uncle follows Morpeth Town who play in the Northern Premier League Premier Division. THat's the seventh level of English football. They get about 500 fans at home matches and he loves it!

Let us know if you have any other questions!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

 

Fred Zhong
10/01/2020
CN
72
points

I chose Jack's idea because it was derived from the representation of regional animal.I didn't choose Rich's idea because I think he was joking.
The phrase is "*****-*******".


Fred Zhong
10/01/2020 13:57
China
Manchester United
72

I chose Jack's idea because it was derived from the representation of regional animal.I didn't choose Rich's idea because I think he was joking.
The phrase is "*****-*******".

Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020
ES
444
points

Joking? Really? Yes!


Rich's picture
Rich
15/01/2020 08:23
Spain
Liverpool
444

Joking? Really? Yes!

Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
10/01/2020
UA
3713
points

I think that the phrase is '*****-****er'


Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
10/01/2020 09:26
Ukraine
Watford
3713

I think that the phrase is '*****-****er'

Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
10/01/2020
UA
3713
points

little correction: the phrase is '*****-*******'


Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
10/01/2020 09:51
Ukraine
Watford
3713

little correction: the phrase is '*****-*******'

Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
09/01/2020
UA
4102
points

The phrase this week is *****-*******.


Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
09/01/2020 20:04
Ukraine
Liverpool
4102

The phrase this week is *****-*******.

Rich's picture
Rich
10/01/2020
ES
444
points

Well done, Alex. You're the first to get the football phrase this week.

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team


Rich's picture
Rich
10/01/2020 09:04
Spain
Liverpool
444

Well done, Alex. You're the first to get the football phrase this week.

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
10/01/2020
UA
4102
points

Google happens to be a good helper, Rich. Good luck to Liverpool tomorrow ! 


Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
10/01/2020 09:42
Ukraine
Liverpool
4102

Google happens to be a good helper, Rich. Good luck to Liverpool tomorrow ! 

Leaderboard

Top Scorers
RankNameScore
1kwesimanifest4752
2Alex_from_Ukraine4102
3wsanta3991
4Liubomyr3713
5assemjuve3705
6aragorn19863557
7elghoul3409
8haydi3189
9Ahmed Adam Mamado2876
10milos2575
Country ranking
RankNameScore
1Colombia69693
2Ukraine29774
3Serbia26927
4Albania20448
5Spain20184
6Macedonia19058
7Bosnia and Herzegovina16248
8Armenia13649
9Vietnam13646
10Kosovo13125
Club ranking
RankNameScore
1Manchester United124158
2Liverpool83448
3Chelsea71304
4Arsenal68574
5Manchester City40650
6Leicester City11039
7Tottenham Hotspur8647
8Newcastle United7489
9West Ham United4646
10Watford4394

Level

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

Goals

Skills: Listening

Language: Giving reasons 

Task: Decide on a nickname and mascot for Jack's football team