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Phil & Gary Neville, Nicky Butt and Paul Scholes juggling oranges.

Modals of Deduction: Who stole the oranges?

Modals of Deduction: Who stole the oranges?

In this week's Premier Skills English Podcast, something goes missing at a local football club and the club turns to Geoff the groundsman (a part-time detective) to find the thief. The language focus is on modal verbs of deduction in the past, present and future. In this week's task, you get the chance to be the detective. Don't forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have a new football phrase for you to guess.

Transcript

If the listening was a bit difficult, you can listen again and read the transcript at the same time.
Read and listen at the same time.

Understanding Grammar: Modal Verbs of deduction
Introduction

Jack: Hello my name’s Jack

Rowan: My name’s Rowan

Rich: and I’m Rich and welcome to this week’s Premier Skills English podcast

Jack: In the Premier Skills English podcast, we talk about football and help you with your English. 

Rowan: In this week’s roleplay, we discover that there is a thief at the football club. 

Rich: We need to find out who the thief is before anything else goes missing so we turn to our very own Sherlock Holmes.

Rowan: Well, we couldn’t afford Britain's finest private detective so we hired our very own Sherlock Holmes

Rich: We’ve hired Geoff the groundsman. He does a bit of private detective work when he’s not looking after the pitch. He sounds a bit like Jack.

Jack: Funny that. After the roleplay, we’re going to focus on what English teachers call modals of deduction.

Rich: Modals of destruction. I like it. It could be a TV series.

Jack: Deduction not destruction.

Rowan: Modals of deduction. What might they be? I suppose they could be things we use when we make guesses … er no that can’t be right, can it?

Jack: You’re right. That’s exactly what they are. We’re going to look at how they're used in the past, too, which is a little bit more difficult.

Rich: And we’re going to take a look at the pronunciation of modals in the past because that can also be tricky.

Rowan: Your task this week is a little different, too because we want you to listen to three different scenarios or mysteries and make guesses or deduce who did what.

Jack: Yeah, we want everyone to be like Groundsman Geoff - a super sleuth - a number one detective. 

Rich: More from Groundsman Geoff in our roleplay in a couple of minutes.

Rowan: If you’re listening to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or any other podcast platform, you should also check out our website.

Jack: That’s because on the Premier Skills English website you’ll also find the transcript, examples and activities to help you understand the language, a task for you to do and a community of friendly listeners to interact with, in our comments section.

Rich: And that includes us - we’re always around to answer questions and join the discussions.

Rowan: Right, let’s move on to our next section and last week’s football phrase.

Last week’s Football Phrase 

Jack: If you didn’t hear our football phrase last week we’re going to give you one more chance to guess now. 

Rowan: This week’s football phrase is an action on the pitch. It’s called * ****** ****. Imagine you have the ball at your feet and a defender is in front of you. Right, now pull back one leg like you are going to pass the ball to a teammate then instead, stop your foot when it’s over the ball and pull the ball back behind your other leg, spin 180 degrees and run away with the ball. The defender will still be looking the other way if you do *** ****** **** well.

Rich: Jack also said that the phrase is connected to a Dutch footballer last week. I wonder if that gave the game away. We’ll reveal the answer at the end of the show.

Rowan: We’ll also have a new football phrase for you at the end of the show. Did anyone get the right answer last week?. 

Jack: Yes, of course. We know that even if it’s a really tough phrase that some of you will get it right! The first listener to get it right last week was Mohamed Kuma from Sudan. Well done Mohamed!.

Rich: Also a big well done to Marco Zapien, Hayato from Japan, Elghoul from Algeria, Luibomyr from Ukraine, Lakerwang from China, Gergo Nagy from Hungary, Yasser Salama from Egypt and Wsanta from Argentina who also got it right.

Rowan: Remember we’ll have a new football phrase for you to guess at the end of the show.

Introduction to Roleplay

Jack: In this section, you’re going to hear a roleplay. You’re going to hear about the strange disappearance of the half-time oranges at a local football club.

Rich: It’s a job for Groundsman Geoff who works as a private detective in his spare time.

Rowan: While you are listening, we want you to answer a couple of questions:

Rowan: Who stole the oranges?

Jack: What’s the evidence against this person?

Roleplay

Jack: Great to get that goal just before half-time.

Rich: It was a great finish. Let’s finish the job in the second half.

Jack: I’m parched. I’m so thirsty … Where are those oranges?

Rich: They can’t have gone missing again! What’s going on?

Rowan: This is an absolute disgrace. Who is this orange thief? We’ve got to get to the bottom of this!!!

Jack: I’m sure we will boss, see you tomorrow.

Rowan: Bye 

Rich: See you.


Rowan: Come around guys! Great game yesterday. Shame we couldn’t hang on for all three points.

Jack: I just ran out of energy, boss.

Rich: Maybe if we’d had those half-time oranges we’d have been able to keep going.

Rowan: Yes, the orange thief. I don’t know what’s happening but we’re on it. Geoff the groundsman is on the case. If anyone can find this orange pilferer it’s Geoff.

Jack: We need answers boss. I’m not sure we can carry on without our oranges.

Rich: This thief is costing us points boss.

Rowan: We’re on it and Geoff will be looking into it this week. He’ll be around all week snooping ... I mean looking around the place.

Jack: See you at training on Tuesday, boss.

Rich: Have a good weekend.

Rowan: You too, bye.


Rowan: Gather round lads. Before you go out for the warm-up, you know Geoff has been looking into this orange business … Geoff

Geoff: It’s been a strange week - I didn’t really know what was going on. Who would steal the team’s half-time oranges?

Rowan: Someone must be sneaking into the dressing room. 

Geoff: At first, I thought the thief might be someone we don’t know but, you know me, boss. I’m in charge of locking up this place and keeping everything safe and secure. The first thing I did was rule out any outsiders. It must be someone who works here or plays football here. 

Rich: What? It’s an inside job?!

Geoff: Certainly.

Rich: And you are accusing us?

Geoff: Certainly not. I’m not accusing anyone. I know exactly who it is.

Rowan: How do you know?

Jack: It can’t be me! 

Rich: It can’t have been him. He’s got a citrus allergy. You know about his citrus allergy, don’t you Geoff. He can’t go near oranges.

Geoff: I know, I know. I did think you might have tried getting rid of the oranges for that reason. Guys! One of the squad has a citrus allergy! Why not have bananas at half-time?

Rowan: Good idea, Geoff. No more oranges.

Rich: And it wasn’t me!

Geoff: I did get a distinct smell of oranges from you and suspected it might have been you for a while but I soon realised that this smell was present on arrival at training and after a little bit of deduction and reconnaissance I discovered you live next to an orange grove.

Rich: I was about to tell you that. 

Geoff: I thought it might have been Johnny when I got a whiff of oranges one morning as he went past me after training but I soon deduced that the smell seemed to emanate solely from the top of his head and was only present after the players had showered.

Rich: It must have been his new shampoo, Geoff. Essential oils with a hint of citrus.

Geoff: It certainly was. You might want to use a bit less of that stuff Johnny. It’s pretty pungent! No, the person I’m looking for is not one of the players but another member of staff.

Rowan: Bobby the ball boy!

Geoff: No, not Bobby.

Rowan: Pete the physio? 

Geoff: You know it’s not Pete! 

Rich: How does she know?

Geoff: Because the locker room larcenist, pick me up pilferer, citrus swindler, break time bandit, orange outlaw ... has been you all along!

Rowan: How dare you!

Rich: But Rowan can’t have done it! She’s out on the pitch with us!

Geoff: Ah, that is certainly true ... Most of the time. I first suspected you when I saw you going back to the dressing room early in the first half of matches. At first, I thought you must have been going back for something important but you always returned empty-handed.

Rowan: I drink too much tea and nature called ... I’m forgetful … I leave things in my office all the time … my phone … my notepad has all our tactics on it ...  What can I say? 

Geoff: But you would come back licking your lips, look refreshed and reinvigorated as if your thirst had been quenched, somehow. 

Geoff: You must have been drinking some orange juice.

Rowan: Never!

Geoff: And then, have you never noticed guys? How loud does she listen to those matches in her office? The football commentary on the TV blasting out. It can’t be that pleasant to listen at that volume.

Rowan: I am hard of hearing in my left ear!

Geoff: You are not! It was a cover-up - literally. You were covering up the sound of this!

Rowan: My juicer!

Geoff: My evidence! Step this way. Open the locker.

Rowan: I’ve lost the key … It’s not my locker. I’ve never seen an orange before. I’m allergic. Geoff, you're sacked - fired. Sherlock Holmes my ... See you at training tomorrow lads …. bye.

Language Focus

Rich: Before the roleplay, we asked you two questions. 

Rowan: The first question was: Who stole the oranges?

Jack: It was the manager. Can you believe it? Biting the hand that feeds her!

Rich: And the second question was: What’s the evidence against her?

Rowan: All circumstantial evidence! 

Jack: Well, there’s the juicer, trips to the dressing room to drink orange juice and then you run away when asked to open your locker!


Jack: In the roleplay, Geoff the Groundsman played the role of a detective to find out who stole the half-time oranges.

Rich: He worked out or deduced that it was the manager who had taken the oranges. To deduce means to form an opinion based on information and evidence available.

Rowan: Geoff, the players and the manager used a few modals of deduction in the roleplay. These are modal verbs we use to make guesses about something using the information we have about it.

Jack: We use a different modal verb depending on how certain we think something is true.

Rich: They are sometimes called modal verbs of speculation but this is when we don’t have any evidence about something. However, they are used in the same way.

Rowan: Modal verbs of deduction or speculation can be used to make guesses about the past, present or future.

Jack: We’re going to start by looking at how these modal verbs are used to talk about the present and the future. The modal verbs we are going to look at are: can’t, might, may, could and must.


Rich: In the roleplay, the manager said a thief must be sneaking into the dressing room to steal the half-time oranges.

Jack: Sneaking means to move quietly without anyone seeing you. A thief sneaks - a thief is sneaky. The manager said a thief must be sneaking into the dressing room. She used the modal verb must followed by an infinitive without to.

Rowan: We use must when we are certain or virtually certain that something is true. A thief must be sneaking into the dressing room. There is no other explanation - it must be true.

Rich: We could also replace must with have to. Listen to these examples:

Jack: A thief has to be sneaking into the dressing room. She must work here - I saw her go into this office earlier. She must be thinking of making a substitution now - we need to do something.

Rowan: We use must when we are certain that something is true. When we think something isn’t true or is impossible we use can’t. 

Rich: In the roleplay, we said ‘it can’t be pleasant to listen to the TV when it’s so loud’. Groundsman Geoff was speculating here. He’s saying it’s impossible that it’s enjoyable to listen to the TV when it’s so loud.

Jack: One of the players also said it can’t be me. The player was saying that it was impossible that he stole the oranges because he had a citrus allergy.

Rowan: Have a listen to these examples: She can’t know - nobody has spoken to her about, have they?, It can’t be him - he said he was in France until next week, They can’t have scored because I didn’t hear the fans cheer.

Rich: OK, so we use must when we are sure something is true and can’t when we are sure something is not true but often we are not sure if something is true or not.

Jack: When we are not sure about something or we think something is possible we can use may, might or could.

Rowan: In the roleplay, Geoff said I thought the thief might be someone we don’t know. We are using might to say that it is possible that the thief was someone they didn’t know. 

Rich: We can use may and could in similar ways although may is a bit more formal. Listen to these examples:

Jack: They could be on their way to the airport. I saw some suitcases. Trains may be delayed due to essential repairs. Sorry for the inconvenience. The Premier League might have to play some matches at neutral venues.

Rowan: So that’s how we can use modal verbs of deduction and speculation in the present and the future. In the next section, we’re going to take a look at how they are used in the past.

...

Rich: When we use modal verbs of deduction to talk about past situations we use the same modal verbs as we’ve just looked at must, may, might, could and can’t with the same meaning but the grammar changes.

Jack: We use the modal verb followed by have followed by the past participle. There were lots of examples in the roleplay. Listen to these examples:

Rowan: It must have been his new shampoo. You must have drunk some orange juice.

Rich: She can’t have done it! She’s out on the pitch with us!  It can’t have been him. He’s got a citrus allergy.

Jack: I did think you might have tried getting rid of the oranges. I thought it might have been Johnny when I got a whiff of oranges one morning.

Rowan: In all of these examples someone is either deducing or speculating. 

Rich: I think it would be a good idea to take a look at some pronunciation here. Listen to Jack and Rowan saying a few of these examples again. Which sounds more natural to you?

Jack: It must’ve bin his new shampoo.

Rowan: It must have been his new shampoo.

Jack: It can’t’ve bin him. He’s got a citrus allergy.

Rowan: It can’t have been him. He’s got a citrus allergy.

Jack: I thought it might’ve bin Johnny when I smelled the oranges.

Rowan:  I thought it might have been Johnny when I smelled the oranges.

Rich: None of these are bad examples but often when we speak quickly we drop and even add or change sounds. This is called connected speech.

Rowan: When Jack was speaking he used lots of weak forms and schwas. The schwa is a very small sound that is very frequent in English. It sounds like this:  Listen to Jack again.

Jack: Must have been. Can’t have been. Might have been. Must have been. Can’t have been. Might have been.

Rich: OK, let’s leave the language there and move on to this week’s task.

Task

Rowan: You are going to hear three scenarios and we want you to respond to each one using some of the language of deduction we used in the roleplay and spoke about in the language focus.

Rich: In each scenario, you will hear a problem or an argument. Your job is to be like Sherlock Holmes or Geoff the Groundsman if you prefer, and work out who did it.

Jack: Listen to each dialogue and think about who must have done it, who can’t have done it, and who might have done it.

Rowan: Here’s scenario 1. There is a strange smell in Rich’s flat. What could it be?

Rich: What’s that smell?

Jack: It’s not me!

Rich: I wasn’t saying that it was. It might be the neighbour cooking. He likes to experiment.

Jack: That can’t be someone cooking. It can’t be something any living thing would eat.

Rich: It smells like it’s coming from the street! Look I can see smoke.

Rowan: What could the smell be?

Jack: Here’s scenario two. Rich isn’t happy. What’s happened to Rich’s muffin? 

Rich: Come on! Where is it?

Rowan: Where’s what? 

Rich: I knew it was you! My muffin! I’ve been waiting all day for that.

Rowan: I don’t know anything about your muffin! I’m just finishing off my lunch here.

Rich: Yeah, right! I’ve only got this apple now. It was my last one.

Rowan: I can’t eat muffins anyway. I’m gluten intolerant, remember!

Jack: Alright - how’s it going?

Rich: What’s that down your shirt? Crumbs!

Rowan: Who’s eaten Rich’s muffin?

Rich: Here’s scenario 3. Jack’s got a speeding ticket but who was driving the car?

Rowan: Have you got the post? Anything for me?

Jack: There’s this.

Rowan: Is that what I think it is?

Jack: Another speeding ticket! The 27th of April at 8:54 P.M. Look I was teaching then. I was in class. I wasn’t driving my car then. I couldn’t have been.

Rowan: Where did it happen?

Jack: On the motorway near the shopping centre. A Thursday evening. Don’t you go out near there on a Thursday night?

Rowan: No way. Look, I hardly ever borrow your car. Wait a minute. Wasn’t the 27th a holiday? You weren’t teaching …

Jack: Er .. well, maybe I …

Rich: Who was driving Jack’s car?

Rowan: Write all your answers in the comments section on the Premier Skills English website and try to use some of the modals of deduction we’ve introduced in this podcast.

Jack: or write your answers in the review section on Apple Podcasts if that’s where you listen to us.

Football Phrase 

Rich: Our final section as alway is our football phrase. It’s your turn this week, Jack.

Jack: This week’s football phrase is * *****-*****. This phrase is used to describe the situation when two players are competing for a loose ball. Each player has more or less an equal chance of getting the ball. To win * *****-***** you need to be stronger in the tackle than your opponent.

Rowan: Outside of football this phrase is used as an adjective to describe things that are split equally between two people or to when you have an equal chance of winning or losing.

Rich: Let’s see who can get it right? Before we leave you we also need to tell you last week’s football phrase. The answer was a Cruyff Turn.

Rowan: Right, that’s all we have time for this week! Don’t forget to write your answers to our questions and make a guess at our football phrase in the comments below. If you get it right, we’ll announce your name on next week’s show. 

Jack: If you have any questions or comments or suggestions for the podcast or anything football or English related, you can leave them on the website in the comments section, on social media, on apple podcasts or you can email us at premierskills@britishcouncil.org.
 
Rich: Bye for now and enjoy your football!

Vocabulary

How much did you understand?

Here is some vocabulary Rowan, Rich and Jack used in the roleplay. Do you know the words in bold?

Geoff the groundsman is a part-time detective. He'll be able to help us.

Who is this orange thief? We’ve got to get to the bottom of this!

I’m not accusing anyone. I know exactly who it is. It's an inside job.

You might want to use a bit less of that stuff Johnny. It’s pretty pungent

How dare you! I have done nothing wrong!

I first suspected you when I saw you going back to the dressing room.

My evidence! Step this way. Open the locker.

Listen to the roleplay again to hear Rich, Rowan and Jack using these words and phrases.

It's common to have oranges at half-time when playing sport in the UK.

Grammar

Modals of deduction: present & future

Throughout the roleplay, models of deduction were used. These are modal verbs we use to make guesses about something using the information we have about it. We use a different modal verb depending on how certain we think something is true. Modal verbs of deduction can be used to make guesses about the past, present or future. Look at these sentences and think about how the modal verb in bold is being used: 

She must work here - I saw her go into this office earlier. 

It can’t be him - he said he was in France until next week.

They could be on their way to the airport. I saw some suitcases.

Modals of deduction to talk about present or future situations are followed by the infinitive without toWe use must when we are certain that something is true. When we think something isn’t true or is impossible we use can’t. When we are not sure about something or we think something is possible we can use may, might or could.

Find out more about models of deduction in the present on our Learn English website.

We think Blackpool are the only team to have played in orange in the Premier League. Blackpool's nickname is the Tangerines which is a small type of orange.

Grammar

Modals of deduction: past

In the roleplay, Geoff the groundsman played the role of a detective to find out who had stolen the half-time oranges. He worked out or deduced that it was the manager who had taken the oranges. He used lots of examples of modals of deduction to talk about past situations.  Look at the words in bold in these sentences you heard in the roleplay:

It must have been his new shampoo. You must have drunk some orange juice.

She can’t have done it! She’s out on the pitch with us!  It can’t have been him. He’s got a citrus allergy.

I did think you might have tried getting rid of the oranges. I thought it might have been Johnny when I got a whiff of oranges one morning.

Modals of deduction to talk about past situations are followed by have and the past participle. We use must when we are certain about something. We use can’t when we think it is impossible that something happened. We use maymight or could when we think it is possible that something happened. 

Find out more about models of deduction in the past on our Learn English website.

Activity 2

Activity 2: In this activity, complete the sentences with past modals of deduction.
Do you know the missing words?

Which fruit do you think is the healthiest half-time snack?

Did you know ..?

Half-time oranges

This week's roleplay involved someone stealing a football team's half-time oranges. Did you know that oranges are traditionally eaten at half-time when playing sports in the UK? Do you think oranges are the best fruit to eat at half-time? Find out more in this article on the topic of fruit at half-time.

Quiz

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Task

A whodunnit

Was it the players who stole the oranges in this week's roleplay?

In this week’s task, we want you to respond to the three scenarios you heard in the podcast and answer the questions below using the modals of deduction we used in the roleplay and spoke about in the language focus.

  1. There is a strange smell in Rich's flat. What could it be?
  2. Rich isn't happy. What's happened to his muffin?
  3. Jack has received a speeding ticket. Who was driving his car?

Listen to the dialogues again if you need to and think about who must have done it, who can’t have done it, and who might have done it.

Write all your answers in the comments section below and don't forget to make a guess at this week's football phrase!

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Comments

Marsenal's picture
Marsenal
15/03/2021
BR
49
points

1. The smell might not have been farts. It could be overcooking food on someones kitchen.
2. Rowan must be the person who ate Rich's muffin due to some crumbs founded down her shirt.
3. Jack con't remember, but he must have driven his car by the time he got a speeding ticket. He wasn't teaching on 27th. The 27th was a holiday.


Marsenal's picture
Marsenal
15/03/2021 13:33
Brazil
Arsenal
49

1. The smell might not have been farts. It could be overcooking food on someones kitchen.
2. Rowan must be the person who ate Rich's muffin due to some crumbs founded down her shirt.
3. Jack con't remember, but he must have driven his car by the time he got a speeding ticket. He wasn't teaching on 27th. The 27th was a holiday.

hsn
12/09/2020
TR
5498
points

Scenario 1-
This smell might have came from over-heated computer cables. It can’t be fire because nobody has heard fire-alarm. It may have been poured bleach out in the bath. Rich can't have sprayed vinegar for disinfecting his flat. It could have came from the street.
Scenario 2-
Rich might have eaten his muffin and he desire one more. In order to get another one without paying its cost he is accusing people -:) It cant be Rowan, Jack must have eaten it. Unknown third person might have eaten it and distributed crumbs on the Jack’s shirt unaware of him.
Scenario 3-
It’s obvius that Jack must have driven his car on the 27th of April. On the other hand Jack might have been in the school although its holiday. Rowan must has driven his car.


hsn
12/09/2020 15:30
Turkey
Tottenham Hotspur
5498

Scenario 1-
This smell might have came from over-heated computer cables. It can’t be fire because nobody has heard fire-alarm. It may have been poured bleach out in the bath. Rich can't have sprayed vinegar for disinfecting his flat. It could have came from the street.
Scenario 2-
Rich might have eaten his muffin and he desire one more. In order to get another one without paying its cost he is accusing people -:) It cant be Rowan, Jack must have eaten it. Unknown third person might have eaten it and distributed crumbs on the Jack’s shirt unaware of him.
Scenario 3-
It’s obvius that Jack must have driven his car on the 27th of April. On the other hand Jack might have been in the school although its holiday. Rowan must has driven his car.

mobeckham's picture
mobeckham
17/06/2020
TR
6496
points

This week's football phrase is ( *****-***** )


mobeckham's picture
mobeckham
17/06/2020 09:00
Turkey
Manchester United
6496

This week's football phrase is ( *****-***** )

mobeckham's picture
mobeckham
17/06/2020
TR
6496
points

1. The smell can't be from Rich's neighbour because it's a strong burning smell so it might be some burning rubbish in the street.

2. Rowan can't have eaten Rich's muffin because she is gluten intolerant . Rich's muffin must have eaten by Jack because he has some crumbs on his shirt.

3. Rich might have driven his car on April 27th because it was a holiday and he might have forgotten.


mobeckham's picture
mobeckham
17/06/2020 08:59
Turkey
Manchester United
6496

1. The smell can't be from Rich's neighbour because it's a strong burning smell so it might be some burning rubbish in the street.

2. Rowan can't have eaten Rich's muffin because she is gluten intolerant . Rich's muffin must have eaten by Jack because he has some crumbs on his shirt.

3. Rich might have driven his car on April 27th because it was a holiday and he might have forgotten.

Fabio7010
10/06/2020
IT
50
points

Hi everyone,

1) The strange smell can't be Rich's neighbour cooking because it's coming from the smoke in the street. It might be burning plastic in the street.

2) Jack must have eaten Rich's muffin because there are some crumbs down his shirt. Rowan is gluten intollerant.

3) Jack himself could have drove the car because the 27th of April was holiday and he wasn't teaching.

The week's football phrase is... I don't know.


Fabio7010
10/06/2020 23:55
Italy
Aston Villa
50

Hi everyone,

1) The strange smell can't be Rich's neighbour cooking because it's coming from the smoke in the street. It might be burning plastic in the street.

2) Jack must have eaten Rich's muffin because there are some crumbs down his shirt. Rowan is gluten intollerant.

3) Jack himself could have drove the car because the 27th of April was holiday and he wasn't teaching.

The week's football phrase is... I don't know.

lakerwang
09/06/2020
CN
337
points

1. It could be a tyre or something that is being on fire.
2. Rowan must have eaten Rich's muffin.
3. Jack himself might have been driving his car.

The football phrase is "* *****-*****".


lakerwang
09/06/2020 17:37
China
Chelsea
337

1. It could be a tyre or something that is being on fire.
2. Rowan must have eaten Rich's muffin.
3. Jack himself might have been driving his car.

The football phrase is "* *****-*****".

Gulmira Kenzhik's picture
Gulmira Kenzhik
09/06/2020
KZ
63
points

The phrase is an even-money


Gulmira Kenzhik's picture
Gulmira Kenzhik
09/06/2020 09:15
Kazakhstan
Arsenal
63

The phrase is an even-money

admin's picture
admin
09/06/2020
GB
560
points

Hi Gulmira

You're close. Even-money is a nice adjective and means the same thing. 

Thanks

Jack - The Premier Skills English team


admin's picture
admin
09/06/2020 09:29
United Kingdom
Arsenal
560

Hi Gulmira

You're close. Even-money is a nice adjective and means the same thing. 

Thanks

Jack - The Premier Skills English team

Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
08/06/2020
UA
6258
points

Liverpool could have won Premier League last year if not for ManCity's mighty final streak. This year Citizens can't do it again. No way!


Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
08/06/2020 14:26
Ukraine
Liverpool
6258

Liverpool could have won Premier League last year if not for ManCity's mighty final streak. This year Citizens can't do it again. No way!

elghoul's picture
elghoul
08/06/2020
DZ
3988
points

1. Rich could have been cooking muffins in his flat and this strange smell must have been the result of overburnt cakes.

2. Rich must have forgotten his muffins under fire.

3. Jack said it can't be him who was flashed by the police. He must have forgotten that at this time nobody else than him might have been driving the car


elghoul's picture
elghoul
08/06/2020 13:23
Algeria
Manchester City
3988

1. Rich could have been cooking muffins in his flat and this strange smell must have been the result of overburnt cakes.

2. Rich must have forgotten his muffins under fire.

3. Jack said it can't be him who was flashed by the police. He must have forgotten that at this time nobody else than him might have been driving the car

Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
07/06/2020
UA
6258
points

The phrase is * *****-*****.


Alex_from_Ukraine's picture
Alex_from_Ukraine
07/06/2020 20:15
Ukraine
Liverpool
6258

The phrase is * *****-*****.

elghoul's picture
elghoul
07/06/2020
DZ
3988
points

Football phrase, ' * *****-***** '


elghoul's picture
elghoul
07/06/2020 15:31
Algeria
Manchester City
3988

Football phrase, ' * *****-***** '

hayato
06/06/2020
JP
442
points

The phrase is * *****-*****


hayato
06/06/2020 09:37
Japan
Everton
442

The phrase is * *****-*****

Gergő Nagy
06/06/2020
HU
3396
points

In the first scenaraio: It might have been a bin, which is in fire because someone threw a cigarette end in.

In the second scenario:The muffins might have been Rowan's dessert.
Because She has finished her lunch and hid the muffins(But she said that: gluten intolerant)

In the third scenario: It could have been Jack because He was in holiday and used the motorway.

This week's football phrase is mystery for me, i can't guess that.


Gergő Nagy
06/06/2020 08:33
Hungary
Chelsea
3396

In the first scenaraio: It might have been a bin, which is in fire because someone threw a cigarette end in.

In the second scenario:The muffins might have been Rowan's dessert.
Because She has finished her lunch and hid the muffins(But she said that: gluten intolerant)

In the third scenario: It could have been Jack because He was in holiday and used the motorway.

This week's football phrase is mystery for me, i can't guess that.

Vic
06/06/2020
MX
817
points

the football phrase divided ball


Vic
06/06/2020 00:40
Mexico
Liverpool
817

the football phrase divided ball

MohamedKuna
05/06/2020
SD
27
points

The phrase is * *****-*****
Love u guys
Stay safe


MohamedKuna
05/06/2020 21:16
Sudan
Liverpool
27

The phrase is * *****-*****
Love u guys
Stay safe

Nicolasm27's picture
Nicolasm27
05/06/2020
CO
27
points

The phrase is * *****-***** Cheers!


Nicolasm27's picture
Nicolasm27
05/06/2020 18:13
Colombia
Liverpool
27

The phrase is * *****-***** Cheers!

Marco Zapien's picture
Marco Zapien
05/06/2020
MX
79
points

" *****-*****


Marco Zapien's picture
Marco Zapien
05/06/2020 17:54
Mexico
Wolverhampton Wanderers
79

" *****-*****

wsanta's picture
wsanta
05/06/2020
AR
5086
points

A think the phrase is "* *****-*****"


wsanta's picture
wsanta
05/06/2020 17:14
Argentina
Leeds United
5086

A think the phrase is "* *****-*****"

wsanta's picture
wsanta
08/06/2020
AR
5086
points

The autocorrector in Spanish on my phone replaced the letter "I" with an "A". Sorry.


wsanta's picture
wsanta
08/06/2020 23:51
Argentina
Leeds United
5086

The autocorrector in Spanish on my phone replaced the letter "I" with an "A". Sorry.

admin's picture
admin
09/06/2020
GB
560
points

Hi Wsanta - don't worry about it! My brain autocorrected it when I was reading it and I didn't even notice.

 


admin's picture
admin
09/06/2020 09:30
United Kingdom
Arsenal
560

Hi Wsanta - don't worry about it! My brain autocorrected it when I was reading it and I didn't even notice.

 

Leaderboard

Top Scorers
RankNameScore
1mobeckham6496
2Alex_from_Ukraine6258
3hsn5498
4wsanta5086
5kwesimanifest4768
6Liubomyr4408
7elghoul3988
8assemjuve3705
9aragorn19863557
10Gergő Nagy3396
Country ranking
RankNameScore
1Colombia71202
2Ukraine33203
3Spain27893
4Serbia27249
5Brazil22802
6Albania20578
7Vietnam19389
8Turkey19099
9Macedonia19074
10Bosnia and Herzegovina16333
Club ranking
RankNameScore
1Manchester United138942
2Liverpool108356
3Chelsea87178
4Arsenal81742
5Manchester City54968
6Tottenham Hotspur18648
7Newcastle United10302
8West Ham United7219
9Crystal Palace3944
10AFC Bournemouth3867

Level

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

Goals

Skills: Listening

Grammar: Modal verbs of deduction in the present and future

Grammar: Modal verbs of deduction in the past

Task: Do some detective work!