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Burnley's New Zealand striker Chris Wood turns to celebrate after his header beats Everton's English goalkeeper Jordan Pickford

Learning Vocabulary: Phrasal verbs with 'turn'

Learning Vocabulary: Phrasal verbs with 'turn'

In this week's Premier Skills English Podcast, Jack and Rich talk about television, films and cinema. In our roleplays, they take a trip to the cinema and talk about films they would like to see. The language focus is vocabulary connected to the cinema and phrasal verbs with 'turn'. Your task this week is to persuade other listeners to watch a film you enjoyed. Don't forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have a new football phrase for you to guess, too. Enjoy!

Transcript

If the listening was a bit difficult, you can listen again and read the transcript at the same time.
Read the transcript and listen at the same time.

Phrasal verbs with 'turn'

Rich: Pass us the remote, Jack.

Jack: What for?

Rich: We want to watch the match.

Jack: I’m watching this.

Rich: Come on. Turn it over. What is it? Is it on Netflix? You can watch it whenever you want.

Jack: It’ll be finished in a minute. It’s only Liverpool they never score in the first half.

Rich: It’s coming on now. Turn this off. Look there are the credits!

Jack: Alright, alright, calm down! Here you go.

Welcome - Going to the cinema

Rich: Hello my name’s Rich

Jack: and I’m Jack

Rich: and welcome to this week’s Premier Skills English podcast

Jack: Where we talk about football and help you with your English.

Jack: What’s happening this week, Rich?

Rich: In this week’s podcast, we’re going to talk about television and the cinema.

Jack: We’ll also look at some common words and phrases we use when talking about TV and the cinema and some phrasal verbs with the word ‘turn’.

Rich: Turn around a minute.

Jack: What? Why? 

Rich: Turn around.

Jack: Err ... OK.

Rich: Good. So, that’s one example of a phrasal word with ‘turn’ and we’ll look at a lot more in this podcast.

Jack: Right, Okay then. And, don’t forget to listen to the end of the podcast because we have this week’s football phrase for you to guess.

Rich: In the next section, you’re going to listen to two roleplays. In the both roleplays we are speaking about films and in the second we are outside the cinema.

Jack: Sounds good. Let’s do roleplay one.

Roleplay 1

Rich: Hey Jack. Have you seen any good films lately?

Jack: I saw a really good one the other day. It’s called They Shall Not Grow Old. It’s just come out.

Rich: What’s it about? I’ve not heard of it.

Jack: It’s directed by Peter Jackson who directed the Lord of the Rings trilogy. It’s about World War One and uses lots of old footage. It adds colour to the old film and the words of the soldiers that were in the war. Jackson turns the old footage into something that looks really modern.

Rich: Is it a documentary?

Jack: Yes, and it’s brilliant.

Rich: It sounds good and I think I’ll have to check it out but I’m going to the cinema with my two boys.

Jack: Ahh! It might not be suitable for them. I think it’s got a fifteen rating. What about the Incredibles 2? I went with the whole family and we thought it was … incredible!

Rich: Oh yeah, this is a sequel, isn’t it? I remember the first one being absolutely hilarious. It was a massive hit at the box office, wasn’t it?

Jack: This one’s got really good reviews, too. I think it’s a much better family option and everything turns out well in the end!

Roleplay 2

Jack: Yeah, five minutes I’ll catch you up, guys. Rich always turns up a bit late. 

Rich: Hey, Jack. Sorry, I’m late. Where is everybody?

Jack: They’ve gone to get some popcorn.

Rich: What are we going to see?

Jack: They told me to let us decide. Let’s go and have a look at what’s on. All the films are up there on the posters.

Rich: I don’t mind what we watch as long as I don’t have to sit through Smallfoot again.

Jack: What’s that?

Rich: I watched it with the kids. It’s about a Yeti looking for humans. I wanted to turn it off after about five minutes.

Jack: OK, no kids' movies. What about fantastic beasts?

Rich: I thought we said no kids' movies. Isn’t that like Harry Potter?

Jack: I think it’s a bit darker and it’s got a really good cast - Johnny Depp and Jude Law are in it. The first one was a massive hit.

Rich: I’ve heard this one is a bit of a flop and I haven’t seen the first one and I hate watching sequels if I haven’t seen the first one. I won’t know what’s going on.

Jack: Alright, what about Bohemian Rhapsody. It’s all about the pop group Queen - you know the song ‘I’m just a small boy from a poor family …’.

Rich: No, I’m not a fan. Musicals are a real turn off for me and the audience will probably start singing and they might be worse than you!

Jack: There’s not much else on. I think we should go for Fantastic Beasts.

Rich: Look there. Special screening.

Jack: One night in Istanbul.

Rich: Never heard of it. Hold on. Directed by James Marquand. This is what it says: Gerry and Tommy are two loveable Liverpool cabbies who dream of bringing their grown-up sons to the 2005 Champions League final in Istanbul.

Jack: Really?

Rich: Come on let’s get the tickets before they sell out!

Language Focus

Jack: Let’s start this section by looking at some of the vocabulary that we’ve used in the podcast that is connected to the cinema and TV.

Rich: We’re going to start with some language that will help you persuade someone else to watch or not watch a film. 

Jack: I said that the film They Shall Not Grow Old has just come out. To come out is a phrasal verb to mean released or published. 

Rich: When Jack says it’s just come out, he’s saying that the film is new. 

Jack: Two common words you hear in connection with the success of films are hit and flop. A hit is used to describe something that is a success and a flop is something that is unsuccessful.

Rich: Jack said that the first Fantastic Beasts film was a massive hit, but I said the sequel was a bit of a flop.

Jack: Sequel is another tricky word we hear a lot. A sequel is a film or story that continues from an earlier one.

Rich: You sometimes get prequels too, which is when a film or story is about things that happened before the first film or story.

Jack: When there are three films in the same story it can be described as a trilogy - like Lord of the Rings.

Rich: If there are more films it can be described as a film series or sometimes you hear the word franchise.

Jack: The word franchise is more connected to business. You often hear the Star Wars franchise or the Harry Potter franchise when talking about finance.

Rich: What about more words and phrases to persuade?

Jack: You can say ‘you should check it out’. Check out is a phrasal verb and it means to look at something because it’s interesting. 

Rich: To persuade people to watch a film, you might also say how good the cast is - the cast is the actors in the film, or how good the plot is, which is the story of the film, or it has a great script, which is the words in the film or the special effects are impressive..

Jack: We’ve got more activities to help you with vocabulary connected to film on the website page.

Rich: And if you haven’t seen it we’ve got a whole course about football and films on the Premier Skills website. Just hit the Live button on the Premier Skills English homepage and you will see the course with the title ‘Learning English: Football& Films’.

Sting

Jack: Now we’re going to look at some phrasal verbs with ‘turn’ that we used in this podcast. Let’s start with ‘turn over’ and ‘turn off’.

Rich: In the opening conversation, I wanted Jack to change the channel on the television and stop watching his film. 

Jack: Rich said, ‘turn it over’ and ‘turn this off’. 

Rich: Other similar phrasal verbs are ‘turn on’ which is the opposite of ‘turn off’ and ‘turn up’ and ‘turn down’ which mean to increase and decrease the sound on the television or other devices.

Rich: Earlier I asked Jack to ‘turn around’ which means to turn direction and face the other way.

Jack: In the first roleplay, I was speaking about the film They Shall not Grow Old and I said I thought it was amazing how the director had turned old film into something that appeared really modern.

Rich: The phrasal verb is turned into. It means to change something from one thing to another thing.

Jack: Other examples could be Bruce Wayne turning into Batman or Clark Kent turning into Superman.

Rich: Jack also told me to watch the Incredibles because everything turns out well in the end. The phrasal verb here is turn out which means happened in a specific way.

Jack: Another example could be: I baked a cake for the first time the other day and it turned out to be surprisingly good.

Rich: In the second roleplay, Jack said that Rich always turns up late. Here it doesn’t mean to increase the sound because like a lot of phrasal verbs it has more than one meaning. In this example, it means ‘arrive’.

Jack: That’s quite a lot of phrasal verbs: turn out, turn off, turn up, turn over, turn down … on the podcast page on the website we’re going to check your understanding of these phrasal verbs.

Task

Rich: This week’s task is to tell us about a film that you think we should all see.

Jack: Tell us why we should check it out. Does it have good reviews? Was it a hit at the box office? Does it have a good cast and a good plot?

Rich: Tell us in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Football Phrase

Rich: Have you got a football phrase for us this week? 

Jack: Yes, I have, but first, our last football phrase. The phrase was 'appeal'. If someone doesn’t agree with something, they can appeal against the decision by making a formal request to the authorities for the decision to be changed.

Rich: Well done to Acicala from Spain, Lakerwang from China, and Luibomyr from Spain. You got the right answer!

Jack: This week’s football phrase is **** ********. This phrase means not concentrating at set-pieces such as free-kicks and corners and looking at the ball rather than the player you are supposed to be marking.

Rich: Quite difficult that one. Right, that’s all we have time for this week. Don’t forget to write your answers to the task and football phrase in the comments section below.

Jack: Bye for now and enjoy your football!

Vocabulary

How much did you understand?

In the podcast, Rich and Jack used some words and phrases that might be new for you. Do you know the words in bold?

Pass us the remote, Jack!

Turn this off. Look there are the credits!

The film is about World War One and uses lots of old footage.

It might not be suitable for them. I think it’s got a fifteen rating.

There were a few more tricky words and phrases in the podcast. Do you know what they all mean? Try the activity below, then, listen to the podcast again to hear how we used the words. This can really help your understanding.

Activity 1

Activity 1: In this activity, try to match the words and phrases to their definitions. All of the words were in this week's podcast.
Can you match the words to the definitions?

Bruce Wayne TURNS INTO Batman. How many phrasal verbs with 'turn' do you know?

Language

The Cinema

In this week's podcast, Jack and Rich spoke about television and the cinema. There were quite a few words to learn. Let's start by looking at types of film.

Types of film:

Look at these sentences from the podcast. Do you know what the type of film (in bold) is?

Musicals are a real turn off for me and the audience will probably start singing and they might be worse than you!

It is a fantasy but more for teenagers and adults.

In this activity, look at the definitions and try to match them to the film type or genre.

Activity 2

Activity 2: In this activity, match the types of films with the correct definitions.
What kind of film is it?

Words connected to a film's success:

When writing about a film and whether it has been successful or unsuccessful there are quite a few specific phrases that you can use. Take a look at these phrases that were used in the podcast:

It was a massive hit at the box office, wasn’t it?

It got really good reviews.

I’ve heard this one is a bit of a flop.

Phrasal verbs:

We focussed on phrasal verbs with 'turn' in this podcast but there were a few other phrasal verbs, too. Do you know the meaning of the words in bold?

It’s called They Shall Not Grow Old. It’s just come out.

I hope I don’t have to sit through Smallfoot again. It was so boring.

It sounds good and I think I’ll have to check it out.

Harry Potter was a massive HIT at the BOX OFFICE.

Vocabulary

Phrasal Verbs with 'turn'

Phrasal verbs with 'turn'. How many do you know? Look at these sentences from the podcast:

Bruce Wayne turns into Batman and Clark Kent turns into Superman.

It’s about a Yeti looking for humans. I wanted to turn it off after about five minutes.

I baked a cake for the first time the other day and it turned out to be surprisingly good.

In this podcast, the language focus was on phrasal verbs with 'turn'. Take a look at the next activity. Can you choose the right preposition for each gap?

Activity 3

Activity 3: In this activity, test your knowledge of phrasal verbs with 'turn'.
Can you choose the correct preposition?

Rich and Jack get tickets to see One Night in Istanbul at the cinema. What do you think it's about?

Quiz

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How much film vocabulary did you learn in this week's podcast?

Task

Recommending a film

This week’s task is to tell us about a film that you think we should all see.

Tell us:

  • Why should we check it out?
  • Does it have good reviews?
  • Was it a hit at the box office?
  • Does it have a good cast?
  • Does it have a good plot or amazing special effects?

Write your answers in the comments section below and don't forget to make a guess at our football phrase.

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Komentar

Rafael Robson's picture
Rafael Robson
21/11/2018
BR
166
points

I would like to recommend the documentary "Brothers in Football", from BT Sport. In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the end of WWI, it's just come out and shows the fascinating story of Corinthian FC.
Today, after a merge with Casuals FC, Corinthian-Casuals is an amateur team of UK. But in the 1900s they were successful and invited to make tours in South America. By the way, my club in Brazil, SC Corinthians Paulista was named after them.
The documentary tells the story related to one of these tours, which was tragically interrupted by the start of WWI in 1914 since the players decided returned home to join the cause. They lost more men than any other football club in WWI. According to a review, it is a really inspiring plot.


Rafael Robson's picture
Rafael Robson
21/11/2018 15:09
Brazil
Tottenham Hotspur
166

I would like to recommend the documentary "Brothers in Football", from BT Sport. In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the end of WWI, it's just come out and shows the fascinating story of Corinthian FC.
Today, after a merge with Casuals FC, Corinthian-Casuals is an amateur team of UK. But in the 1900s they were successful and invited to make tours in South America. By the way, my club in Brazil, SC Corinthians Paulista was named after them.
The documentary tells the story related to one of these tours, which was tragically interrupted by the start of WWI in 1914 since the players decided returned home to join the cause. They lost more men than any other football club in WWI. According to a review, it is a really inspiring plot.

Idelberto's picture
Idelberto
20/11/2018
BR
6
points

It's a special learning about "to turn"


Idelberto's picture
Idelberto
20/11/2018 22:02
Brazil
Liverpool
6

It's a special learning about "to turn"

acicala's picture
acicala
18/11/2018
ES
-1070
points

I think there are few good films about football. Maybe football isn't a very cinematographic subject. But I remind a really entertaining film titled "Victory". The plot takes place during the Second World War in Nazi-occupied Paris. A group of Allied prisoners will have to play a football match against a Nazi team. They will use the game as a means of escape from the prison camp. It's directed by master John Huston and the cast is absolutely amazing: Sylvester Stallone, Michael Caine, Max von Sydow and Pelé, Bobby Moore and many other football players.
Maybe this week's football phase is “left unmarked”.


acicala's picture
acicala
18/11/2018 15:39
Spain
Chelsea
-1070

I think there are few good films about football. Maybe football isn't a very cinematographic subject. But I remind a really entertaining film titled "Victory". The plot takes place during the Second World War in Nazi-occupied Paris. A group of Allied prisoners will have to play a football match against a Nazi team. They will use the game as a means of escape from the prison camp. It's directed by master John Huston and the cast is absolutely amazing: Sylvester Stallone, Michael Caine, Max von Sydow and Pelé, Bobby Moore and many other football players.
Maybe this week's football phase is “left unmarked”.

Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
16/11/2018
UA
3256
points

I think that the phrase is '**** ********'


Liubomyr's picture
Liubomyr
16/11/2018 16:52
Ukraine
Watford
3256

I think that the phrase is '**** ********'

elghoul's picture
elghoul
16/11/2018
DZ
2999
points

Football phrase, open-fair playing.


elghoul's picture
elghoul
16/11/2018 13:09
Algeria
Manchester City
2999

Football phrase, open-fair playing.

elghoul's picture
elghoul
16/11/2018
DZ
2999
points

I love the film 'Scarface' which came out in the seventies. This story about an Italo-American gangster is very exciting. You should check it out if you want to see with realistic details how a son of a catholic Italian deals with his mother and sister and at the same growns up as a mafia boss dealing with narcotics and Colombian drug traffickers. This story has historical sources and was released as a thriller with bloody killings and cocaine addictions. 

Al Pacino turned into Scarface and was brilliant.

It was all with flesh, blood and cocaine.

All the reviews I read were good.

The bloody pictures and sequences have true effects.


elghoul's picture
elghoul
16/11/2018 13:07
Algeria
Manchester City
2999

I love the film 'Scarface' which came out in the seventies. This story about an Italo-American gangster is very exciting. You should check it out if you want to see with realistic details how a son of a catholic Italian deals with his mother and sister and at the same growns up as a mafia boss dealing with narcotics and Colombian drug traffickers. This story has historical sources and was released as a thriller with bloody killings and cocaine addictions. 

Al Pacino turned into Scarface and was brilliant.

It was all with flesh, blood and cocaine.

All the reviews I read were good.

The bloody pictures and sequences have true effects.

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Top Scorers
RankNameScore
1kwesimanifest4662
2assemjuve3696
3aragorn19863557
4Liubomyr3256
5haydi3189
6elghoul2999
7Ahmed Adam Mamado2859
8Alex_from_Ukraine2706
9nikosonris2453
10Buchiy2395
Country ranking
RankNameScore
1Colombia64227
2Ukraine26746
3Serbia25779
4Albania20415
5Macedonia19058
6Bosnia and Herzegovina16217
7Spain14587
8Armenia13351
9Kosovo13096
10Bolivia12677
Club ranking
RankNameScore
1Manchester United114413
2Liverpool67793
3Arsenal65046
4Chelsea64452
5Manchester City32362
6Leicester City10594
7Tottenham Hotspur7010
8Newcastle United6165
9West Ham United4470
10Watford3882

Level

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

Goals

Skills: Listening

Language: Phrasal verbs with 'turn'

Language: Words and phrases connected to the cinema

Task: Persuading others to watch a film